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**I am a member of the Career Collective, a group of resume writers and career coaches.  Each month, all members discuss a certain topic.  This month, we are talking about favorite resources for job seekers. Please follow our tweets on Twitter #careercollective.  You can also view the other member’s interesting posts at the end of the article.

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When you are looking for your next job, employment agencies, want ads, and networking can all be used to find leads, but you will certainly want to turn to the Internet as well in conducting your research.

What follows are some of the most popular websites for anyone seeking employment.Some I like, some I’m not crazy about, but they all have their pros and cons. Check them out and let me know what you think!

Execunet is probably my favorite website for $150K+ executive jobseekers. It has a fantastic reputation for having the jobs they say that they will have (unlike some OTHER websites promoting the same thing) and my clients seem to have great luck with it. There is a small monthly fee, but it is nothing in comparison to the job you will get when using it.

Netshare is another favorite for $100K+ jobs for execs. They have a database of thousands of executive jobs across all disciplines and locations.

LinkUp With this company, the job openings are indexed from company websites, not from ‘pay-to-post’ job boards.  Thousands of jobs and websites.

Career Builder is the country’s largest online source for jobs, posting a selection of more than 1.6 million openings. Every month 49.23 million visitors go there, knowing they can find listings for every industry and every type of job. Just remember that number though49 million visitors a month. You better have a darn good resume.

Indeed is a search engine that allows those seeking employment to search jobs posted on a vast array of job boards and company career sites.

SimplyHired, which is located in Silicon Valley, is in the process of “building the largest online database of jobs on the planet.” They also intend to make job hunting uncomplicated, enjoyable, and effective.

Exsearches is perfect for individuals seeking government, nonprofit, health, and education sectors of the job market.

CollegeRecruiter posts a huge number of entry-level online help-wanted listings. Its School Finder program matches individuals who want to continue their education with both traditional and online schools. You will also find a wide selection of blogs, articles, and ‘ask the experts” information here.

SnagAJob links the United States’ hourly workforce with the jobs they need and want. After registering more than 10 million candidates, they are America’s largest job site for full-time and part-time hourly positions.

Note that you can visit job search engines frequently because they are constantly updated, and they will even tell you how many listings have been added since you last did a search, which will enable you to focus on the ones that are new.

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Other articles of interest from the #Career Collective group:

If your industry does not participate online, you can lead the way, @Keppie_Careers

6 Ideas to Put In Your Toolbox, @WorkWithIllness,

Your Best Job Search Resource? You!, @WalterAkana

In a Job Search, Knowledge is Power, @barbarasafani

Jump Start Your Job Search Now!, @resumeservice

Favourite Resources for Jobseekers, @GayleHoward

The Best Job Search Tool Ever, @careersherpa

Find What You Do Best, Know Your Stuff, and Connect, @chandlee

27 Recommended Blogs for Entry-Level Job Seekers, @heatherhuhman

Invaluable Resources for Job Search Success, @heathermundell

Favorite Social-Media Resources for Job-seekers, @KatCareerGal

Canadian Resources for Job Seekers, @EliteResumes @MartinBuckland

A Self-Empowering Job Search Resource, @KCCareerCoach

Covering your bases: 5 ultra-useful online career resources, @LaurieBerenson

Favorite resources for Job seekers, @DawnBugni

Top 3 Resources for Job Seekers to Position Themselves as Experts and Increase their Visibility, @expatcoachmegan

Time as a Career Resource: How “Not” to Squander It, @ValueIntoWords

The Facts Behind Why LinkUp Is the Most Revolutionary Job Search Engine Available to Job Seekers, @GLHoffman

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Looking for a job is not always fun, and you need a good resume to help you along in the process. Here’s an important question to consider—does your resume give the impression that you are overqualified for the job you want? Or, are you truly overqualified to get the job that your heart desires?

Having too many qualifications for a job can be detrimental to a job seeker looking for either a different type of position, or one considered “lower”.  Deciding how to write your resume properly to get the job you want is a necessity.

However, there is one other thing to consider when re-writing your resume, be sure to include the important things. Deleting things from your resume can be very detrimental to your job search, even if you feel it will over-qualify you.

Something else to keep in mind about changing your resume around for the one single job that you want is that the company may have other openings. This is an important point to consider—quite often, a resume will be passed around within a company if the job you want is not available. When you suddenly present a resume that is accurate and different from the original, your prospective employer will be put off. So, the problem that presents itself is how to write the resume, still show that you have a lot of qualifications—but scare possible employers away.

You are determined to get a job that you really want, but you are overqualified for it. There may be a number of reasons for your decision to “lower yourself”, and this is something to consider when talking to prospective employers. Once your resume has made it into an employer’s hands, and they seem interested, some will be confused. Why would you want a job that is beneath you? Have some valid reasons to back yourself up. Tell them what made you come to this decision. You don’t need to say, “well, I can’t get anything else”, but you could say something like, “Yes, I know I might be a little overqualified, but this type of position has always interested me and I think having these extra skills could really impact the position and what it could do for ABC Co.” etc.

Changing industries and jobs may be more difficult to do due to your being over qualified. On the other hand, your willingness to learn something new may make all the difference in the world when the prospective employer considers you for the job. It does not matter if you are overqualified for a job or not—it is still possible to get it. Communicating properly—both verbally and through demonstrating an eagerness to learn and change—will make a huge impression.

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The word “resume” gives some people the shivers when they think about having to write one. This reaction is truly not necessary—all it takes to write a resume is a little bit of effort, and some thought. The following are some basic tips on how to write your resume. While the actual writing process takes a lot of thought, planning and strategy, having a “to do” list like this will keep you on track.

Knowing what will go into a resume is the most important thing. In other words, your very first step is to plan out what will go into the resume—sort of like the term papers you wrote for school, or a shopping list.

Think about what jobs you have done, the time spans each of them have covered, and the job duties included. Don’t put them in a specific order yet, unless it’s easier for you to work that way.

Begin at the top of the resume, and decide the format that you want to create it in. List your name and contact information first. After that will be the career summary, your job experiences, and follow them up with education/credentials/professional development.

Start out writing each job description, in a loose, easy manner. Whether you choose for that to be just a few words for the description, or a list of words done as bullet points, it doesn’t really matter. Whatever works for you is what counts.

Look at the jobs that you have in front of you. Some people prefer to take the paper that they’ve used to jot these descriptions out on, and cut it up to rearrange the jobs into the correct chronological order. Others just use circles and arrows. Once you have decided the order in which you want to put the jobs, look at the descriptions again. Put the words into a coherent, thoughtful description of that particular job.

See? You are already writing a quality resume—it’s that easy.

Refining the job descriptions so that they make sense, don’t run on, and will put you into a positive light are the next step. There are some other things to consider now, in addition to the job descriptions. Education is an important thing to list on your resume. With that in mind, list whatever college or technical/trade school experience you may have. Remember to keep it reverse chronological (the preferred choice), listing the most recent position first.

List things like the GPA that you had, any school-related leadership positions you may have had, and extra-curricular activities as well, but ONLY if you are a new grad.

Now, create a career objective or career summary (I always do mine last, after I get a strong familiarity with the client’s history). What do you want to do in your career? What do you want the reader to know about you, your strengths and what you can contribute? You should remain very clear and focused in this area. Think of your brand. Do you have one?

Learning how to write a resume isn’t difficult as long as you devote the time, thought and planning into it.

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Do you know what this month is?


It’s September: Update Your Resume month.

You may be thinking, “Yeah, so? My resume is fine, and besides, I’m not “looking” for a job, so I don’t need it updated.”  I think perhaps at one point in time, a decade or so ago, it was OK to be that sure, but not anymore.

Do yourself a favor, get it updated today and save yourself any anxiety in the future when the perfect opportunity presents itself, because you will be COMPLETELY PREPARED.

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Another gem from my favorite success coach, Jack Canfield!

Jack’s words have dramatically transformed my business and my life. My wish is that they do the same for you.

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Saying No to Others is Saying YES to Yourself
by Jack Canfield

There are only two words that will always lead you to success.  Those words are yes and no.  Undoubtedly, you’ve mastered saying yes.  So start practicing saying no.  Your goals depend on it!

If you are constantly saying yes to other people, then you are constantly saying no to yourself and your goals.   Ask yourself if what is being requested of you is in line with your goals, will it benefit you in some way and bring you closer to your success, or will you simply be spending your time on someone else’s good opportunity?

How much time do you waste with projects and activities that you really don’t want to do simply because you are uncomfortable saying no?

Success depends on getting good at saying no without feeling guilty.  You cannot get ahead with your own goals if you are always saying yes to someone else’s projects and agendas.

What a simple concept this is, yet you’d be surprised how frequently even the world’s top entrepreneurs, professionals, educators and civic leaders get caught up in projects, situations and opportunities that are merely good, while the great is left out in the cold—waiting for them to make room in their lives.  In fact, concentrating on merely the “good” often prevents the “great” from showing up, simply because there’s no time left in our schedules to take advantage of any additional opportunity.

Is this your situation—constantly chasing after mediocre prospects or pursuing misguided schemes for success, when you could be holding at bay opportunities for astounding achievement?

If saying “No” is so important, then why is it so hard to say?

Why do we find it so hard to say no to everybody’s requests? As children, many of us learned that “no” was an unacceptable answer. Responding with “no” was cause for discipline. Later, in our careers, “no” may have been the reason for a poor evaluation or failing to move up the corporate ladder.

Yet, highly successful people say “no” all the time—to projects, to crazy deadlines, to questionable priorities and to other people’s crises. In fact, they view the decision to say “no” equally acceptable as the decision to say “yes.”

Others say no, but will offer to refer you to someone else for help.  Still others claim their calendar, family obligations, deadlines and even finances as reasons why they must decline requests.  At the office, achievers find other solutions to their co-workers’ repeated emergencies, rather than becoming a victim of someone else’s lack of organization and poor time management.

“It’s not against you, it’s for me…”

One response that I have found helpful in saying “no” to crisis appeals or time-robbing requests from people is… It’s not against you; it’s for me.

When the chairman calls with yet another fund-raising event that needs your dedication, you can say, “You know, my saying no to you is not against you, or what you are trying to do. It’s a very worthy cause, but recently I realized I’ve been over committing myself. So even though I support what you’re doing, the fact is I’ve made a commitment to spend more time with my family. It’s not against you; it’s for us.”

Few people can get angry at you for making and standing by a higher commitment. In fact, they’ll respect you for your clarity and your strength.

So, how can you determine what’s truly great, so you can say no to what’s merely good?

Start by listing your opportunities—one side of the page for good and the other side for great. Seeing options in writing will help crystallize your thinking and determine what questions to ask, what information to gather, what your plan of attack might be, and so on.  It will help you decide if an opportunity truly fits with our overall life purpose and passion, or if it’s just life taking you down a side road.

Talk to advisors about this potential new pursuit. People who have traveled the road before you have vast experience to share and hard-headed questions to ask about any new life opportunity you might be contemplating.  They can talk to you about expected challenges and help you evaluate the “Hassle Factor”—that is, how much time, money, effort, stress and commitment will be required.

Test the waters. Rather than take a leap of faith that the new opportunity will proceed as you expect, conduct a small test, spending a limited amount of time and money.  If it’s a new career you’re interested in, first seek part-time work or independent consulting contracts in that field. If it’s a major move or volunteer project you’re excited about, see if you can travel for a few months to your dream locale or find ways to immerse yourself in the volunteer work for several weeks.

And finally, look where you spend your time. Determine if those activities truly serve your goals or if saying “no” would free up your schedule for more focused pursuits.

Be brave in saying no to good opportunities, stay focused on your higher goals and let people know that you are committed to those goals.  People will respect your clarity and drive.

Remember, just as you are in control of your feelings and attitudes, other people are in control of theirs, so if they do get upset with you for saying no…well that is a choice they make for themselves.

© 2010 The Canfield Training Group
All Rights Reserved

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Jack Canfield, America’s #1 Success Coach, is founder of the billion-dollar book brand Chicken Soup for the Soul© and a leading authority on Peak Performance and Life Success. If you’re ready to jump-start your life, make more money, and have more fun and joy in all that you do, get your FREE success tips from Jack Canfield now at: www.FreeSuccessStrategies.com

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So many people are put off by the idea of writing a resume, and ignore doing it until the absolute last possible minute, many times when it is too late. Using a resume that is written properly will save you a lot of heartache in the end, though—and is worth the time investment. Taking advantage of keywords to write a resume is an excellent idea, particularly if it is done well.

One of the main reasons keywords is such a hot topic is because of company scanning machines. Employers use scanning machines to search for keywords in a candidates resume that match their requirements, weeding out everyone else whose resumes don’t match that.

In the last decade or so, it has become the norm for resumes to be sent out over the internet through search engines—particularly the job hunting search engines. Employers will take advantage of these particular search engines, and feed in the required information for each job posting, and a set of tags. In other words, the tags are the keywords that they are looking for in resumes. These tags not only help the companies, but they help you by permitting you to select categories that you feel fit your skill level better. By knowing what category you picked the job from—operations, finance, sales and marketing—you can re-word your resume using relevant keywords to fit the job description (posting) you are interested in. So, how do you know what keywords to add in a resume?

Make a rough list of what you need to add to your resume. Consider the jobs that are on your resume already. What things do they have in common? Start to think about what words you could conveniently place to attract prospective employers’ attention throughout your resume—words that are part of your past experiences–and relevant to the next position. Previous experience managing a manufacturing company can be turned into a keyword, or two—manufacturing operations or operations executive.

Place the keywords appropriately in your resume. Make the sentence or title that they are in seem natural, yet the placement of the keyword will gain attention, especially in the search engines. Consider a bulleted keyword list under your career summary.  Grabbing the attention of human resource managers or the hiring person is easier if you have a keyword list.

Now that you know how keywords work in a resume, take the time to rework your resume. A little bit of extra effort quite often pays off in the long run—especially when you’re looking for the job of your dreams.

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