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Professional Resume Services c-level personal branding

Avoid these mistakes to make the most of your next networking event!

As an executive, you have been in the workforce for many years. Therefore, you know the importance of  make the most out of networking events as you search for new opportunities. Networking events present people with amazing opportunities to get to know recruiters and learn more about different companies. However, it can be easy to botch a networking event if you make any of these common errors.

1. Going in Unprepared

The first thing you need to do is ask yourself, “How do I create the most effective executive resume?” Even if you have a plethora of experience to add, you may find yourself struggling with knowing where to start and what’s most important to include. Once you find the answer to that question, you can take that initial step into being prepared for your networking event. If you try to use your old resume, you likely won’t find much success and will just be wasting your time. If you find you need help updating and organizing your resume properly, you can always get in touch with a resume writing service.

2. Not Treating Networking Events as Interviews

Colleagues will ask you questions when you’re at a networking event. This is by design, because a networking event is essentially an initial interview and a chance to make a great first impression. Just like you, businesses are trying to find a good match. Now would be the time to brush up on your LinkedIn profile development, because recruiters could (and will) check out your profile right after speaking with you. It never hurts to cover all of your bases. Linkedin is also a great way to do a little digital networking in your spare time.

3. You Don’t Accurately Represent Your Skills

You know all the most important elements to include on a resume. The hard part is figuring out how it all ties into the position you’re seeking with a company. Tailoring your resume for specific positions is a vital aspect of c-level personal branding. It’s not enough to simply list out all of your accomplishments, but to do so with the goals of the company in mind. Think about how you could benefit them and how your skills match their objectives, and you’ll go that much farther come the day of the networking event.

4. Not Visiting With Other Employers

Don’t be laser focused on one or two company employees at a networking event. You may be passing up a great opportunity that was right in front of you! At least shake hands with other executives and strike up conversations with them. They may not have an opening for your position now, but that could change at any time.

5. Not Doing Homework

This may go without saying, but people in the industry talk to each other. It’s likely that your colleagues already know about you, so you need to return the favor. This could start with getting to know the company’s executives on  LinkedIn, but you also need to research information about the specifics of the company. Don’t hesitate to really dig in and learn as much about the companies you’re interested in as you can. The more you know about them and their mission and values, the more productive your meetings and small talk will be at these networking events.

6. Expecting Immediate Results and Accommodation

As an executive, there’s no doubt you’re extremely experienced and qualified for the positions at this networking event. However, you’re not the only one. Yes, you’ve accomplished a lot over the course of your career, but you should never let your achievements go to your head in the middle of a professional event! Remember: you’re up against some stiff competition. Going into the networking event expecting a job right off the bat because of your credentials is a recipe for major self-sabotage. Be humble, be gracious and be open. Try to meet as many new contacts as possible, and stay in touch with them. Even if you don’t get a job right off the bat, going to this event could lead to a new and satisfying position down the road.

Networking events are great resources to find job opportunities you may not have known were even out there. When you’re ready to attend a networking event, feel free to reach out to us if you have any questions or need help preparing so you don’t make these mistakes or others.

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Stand out with C-level personal branding.

C-level personal branding is necessary to stand out.

Everyone has a personal brand, whether they know it or not. It’s important for everyone to clearly define their personal brand, but it’s especially critical for high-level executives. As C-level personal branding has increased in importance, the myths surrounding it have also grown in number and prevalence. The truth is many people believe these myths, which can negatively impact their personal branding. Here are the top five myths you should know about, and most importantly, shouldn’t believe.

Myth 1: Your Personal Brand Is Equivalent to Your Reputation

You’re allowed to keep your personal life separate from your business/online life. You may have a completely different reputation with your family and friends than with your business colleagues, and there’s nothing wrong with that!

Myth 2: Personal Branding Isn’t Necessary

Many people underestimate the power of personal branding for senior level managers. Just like a reputation, it takes some time to build a solid personal brand, but it can also be ruined in a matter of seconds. If you think personal branding isn’t necessary, think again.

Myth 3: Personal Branding Is Manufactured

C-level personal branding is only effective if it’s not fake. People who try to make themselves sound better than they really are will only hurt themselves in the long run. Top executives can see right through manufactured personal branding so you won’t be doing yourself any good to create a false personal brand.

Myth 4: Personal Branding Takes a Lot of Time

The art of personal branding for senior level managers isn’t as time consuming as people make it out to be. Yes, you have to work on it a little bit, but you shouldn’t have to spend extra time on your personal brand. Every email you respond to or phone call you take either helps or hurts your personal brand. Just be conscious about your actions and your personal brand will essentially develop itself.

Myth 5: Your Personal Brand Makes You Look Selfish

You may try to make yourself look good on a resume or cover letter, but C-level personal branding is different. As a top executive, you likely have many leadership roles. Being a good leader is one of the best ways to give your personal brand a good image. If you’re able to help others do their jobs better and advance in the rankings, how could you possibly seem selfish?

Most people focus on polishing up their resume, but don’t spend much time thinking about their personal branding. What are you known for? What do you excel at? Many top resume writing services will emphasize your personal brand in your resume, which actually makes it even stronger.

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Professional Resume Services is the best resource for writing an effective resume!

Professional Resume Services is the best resource for writing an effective resume!

If you’ve followed us for a while, or just have ample knowledge of how job searching and the professional world work, then you know the importance of crafting a personal brand. This is how you appeal to other professionals, especially those who may hire you to work for them later on. The main issue for anyone attempting c-level personal branding, however, is figuring out how to go about it efficiently. In this blog, we’ll give you a few tips on how to brand yourself efficiently and catch the eye of recruiters in an instant!

Include Your Accomplishments

While this goes without saying, your accomplishments within your industry will be some of the most important elements of your personal brand and should not be ignored. The key aspect here is how you incorporate them. You don’t want to splay them all out like playing cards strewn on a table. Rather, you can frame them in a way that appeals more readily to employers.

For a few ideas on how to do this, you can always rely on a team of the best executive resume writers in your area or do a bit of independent research. While you should strive to keep your entire resume brief, you can add a bit of color to your stories by describing them in the form of a (very) brief story—three lines maximum, to be precise.

Think About How You’ve Contributed to Your Industry

This part of brand construction may prove a bit challenging, but it is the perfect method of showing any recruiter or hiring agent how you are a valuable employee. By creating your personal brand, you are effectively telling other professionals a story. Make it appealing by getting to the meat of the action! This means displaying your contributions to the past companies you’ve worked for. It may help to follow the C-A-R formula for these contribution stories, ‘C-A-R’ meaning Challenge, Action and Result. Think about what was being asked of you at the time, how you completed the task at hand and what happened afterward.

Research as Much as Possible

Oftentimes catching a glimpse of others’ work and ideas can help inspire you. If you’re stumped as to how to start or flesh out your personal brand, looking at how others have constructed theirs can give you a boost. We don’t mean lifting someone else’s work entirely, however! Writing an effective resume means showcasing your own strengths and individualizing yourself. Copying someone else entirely defeats the purpose.

As you surf through your Google results and check out what other people are doing, be sure to evaluate your own methods and ideas. How can you apply what they’re doing to your own strengths and accomplishments? Think about how you have influenced your previous employers in ways no one else did. This will help you figure out how to brand yourself well.

Additionally, it may help to get in touch with a professional resume writer to learn what you can do to better market yourself. You may come away with a new perspective toward your career and professional potential that you’ve never considered before, one that will wow employers on the spot!

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Professional Resume Services is the best resources for personal branding for senior level managers!So you’ve learned the importance of a personal brand and have made the decision to start working on your own…but what’s next? This is a very common question that has been asked by several senior level professionals just like you. As it turns out, building a personal brand is hard, but it can very much be done! Here’s how.

 

1. Think About Yourself

Every employee, and especially every senior level professional, has something significant to offer a company. You will have to tap into just what your skills and positive personal traits are before you begin crafting your personal brand. In fact, this is the first step of c-level personal branding. It may help to approach this issue from the perspective of an employer and figure out what traits are most desirable in any employee, then work backwards to hash out what makes you unique from every other applicant out there. Craft a story about yourself for your hiring audience to read.

 

2. Start Pruning Your Presence Online

While no one will admit to Googling themselves, it will actually help you figure out one of the most important parts of branding yourself—your name. Keep track of how you’re mentioned online and whether it’s in a negative or positive context.

 

3. Be Mindful of Your Internet Activities

Now that you have an idea of how you’re perceived online, you’ll have to make sure to keep these perceptions under control. Don’t post anything you wouldn’t want potential employers to find later on. If you’ve already engaged in online activities that you wouldn’t necessarily want employers to discover, you will generally have the option to delete them—but be careful!

You can never completely erase something from the Internet once it’s there. In the meantime, you can do any necessary damage control by carefully considering what you post and only letting pictures and other forms of media slip through if they contribute to your efforts toward personal branding for senior level managers.

 

4. Build a Website

Thanks to the advancement of the Internet, building a website is easier than ever! “Why do I need one?” you may ask. For starters, so many business interactions now take place online…from consumers to businesses to potential employees and those in charge of hiring them. A website is a wonderful way of presenting yourself to the world in a quick and aesthetically pleasing manner. Don’t think you have to go big and flashy! Just a paragraph about yourself, contact links and a well written resume will do.

 

5. Look to Older, More Successful Brands

You can find other people who’ve built personal brands by connecting with those who are in either the same industry or are alumni from your alma mater. Connect with these people as soon as possible for tips on how to better construct your personal brand. If you play your cards right, these new associates should prove valuable!

 

On our site, you’ll find information about building a personal brand, writing an effective resume and much more! Once you learn a little more about yourself, you may choose to get some additional help to push your executive job search to the next level!

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Stand out from the crowd with a professional resume writing service.

A professional resume writing service can help you stand out

A lot of resume advice articles you’ve seen have likely told you to keep the fluff to a minimum. In most cases, this is true. Recruiters generally only have a short amount of time to read your resume, meaning you’ll have to make it count by marketing yourself and your experiences in an easily consumable way. However, there’s no reason to dress your resume up, especially if you’re part of an industry where creativity is a highly valued skill. In fact, creating an original design for your resume may be an excellent C-level personal branding tactic, depending upon your execution. We’ve gathered some ideas for your consideration.

Lead Recruiters Your Way With a Map

Whether it’s in the style of classic and long forgotten cartography or in the image of today’s Maps app, you can consider making your resume resemble a map that leads employers straight to you, with all of your experiences and other relevant information to guide them and a handy directional key. You can even tuck your contact info at the bottom to steer them toward how to get in touch with you.

Model Your Resume After Your Social Media Platform of Choice

This takes some clever graphic design skills on your part, but it’s a creative way of introducing yourself to a potential employer. You can do this with any type of platform that gives you a personalized space, whether it’s through a profile page or a blog, or with any site that’s well-recognized and widely used. We recommend not picking LinkedIn for this choice because it’s already formatted for job hunters. You’ll want to create your own unique take on a site not typically used for career networking.

Create Your Resume Out of a Unique Material

This can be an especially clever idea depending on the industry you’re in, such as textiles, fashion or something similar. While it may take some extra work, you can craft your resume from fabric, handmade paper or some other material besides plain, white Xerox paper. Just make sure the end result is readable and, if need be, easy to reproduce. You don’t want to make creating hundreds of copies of a plexiglass resume your new career!

Give Yourself Ratings

You can easily style this sort of resume fairly normally but with some more subtle creative embellishments here and there, up until you get to the final section describing your skills. For this section, utilize a ratings system for an easily readable way of determining your level of skill in any areas you wish. While this won’t necessarily give employers the most detailed idea of your skills, it’s certainly an eye catcher!

While there’s nothing wrong with the tried and true method of bullet points and short sentences in black, 12 point font, it never hurts to think outside of the box! For further tips, you can always consult a professional resume writing service. A top resume writing service will be able to fine tune your resume, regardless of the format.

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Writing an effective resume also require networking.

Networking is just as important as writing an effective resume.

The types of jobs you can get in 2016 are vastly different than what were available decades ago, all thanks to technological advancement. Furthermore, just as the careers available to prospective workers have transformed, so has the way we seek out jobs. Simply sending in applications to openings found on job listing resources no longer seals the deal. Networking is now the ticket to landing most jobs, which means you have to have connections to get desired positions. A large majority of lucrative jobs can no longer be found by scoping the classified section or browsing Craigslist. You have to know someone who already has experience in the industry and ask them to put in a good word for you. If you don’t have the right connections, this problem is easily solvable.

Try Going to Gatherings Related to Your Desired Field

One of the most important steps to attaining C-level personal branding is to get to know people already working in the field you’re aiming to enter. The type of event doesn’t matter so long as you’re out there and meeting people. It never hurts to do a little research before you go to an event, just for the sake of having an idea of who the guests will be and a sense of the best people to introduce yourself to. Bringing your resume can be a good idea, especially for career fairs.

Don’t Count Out the Connections You Already Have

The people you already know can be just as valuable a resource as any while you’re on your job search. This counts for literally everyone you’re familiar with. Write them all out and consider which ones will be the most helpful in terms of assisting with your search. Even if the manner in which they can help you is more indirect, such as them not actually working in that specific field, but knowing someone else who does, can aid in your search. Don’t hesitate to contact them, tell them your situation and ask them to put in good word for you, whether it is with their boss or an employee they happen to be well-acquainted with.

While the process of networking may be a daunting one, it can be infinitely valuable to you if you’re searching for a career. In fact, it’s just as important as writing an effective resume, and should be learned and mastered just as well. Both of these tools can be the key to creating C-level personal branding and landing the job you’ve always wanted, which makes the effort to learn how to perfect them worth it. For help with either of these job hunting tools, you have quite a few resources at your disposal. As the best resume writing service, Professional Resume Services can help you with either.

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Follow these tips for writing a professional resume after you've been fired.

if you’ve been fired, writing a professional resume can be difficult.

Moving on to another job is rarely easy, but when you’ve been fired from your job, regardless of the reason, you may feel like writing a professional resume is even more difficult. This time is when C-level personal branding becomes a necessity. Executive resume writing services can help you rebuild your resume so you can successfully move on from the job you lost.

Accept Responsibility

Even if you feel you were terminated unfairly, chances are you played some role in the decision. One of the worst things you can do is maintain a position of innocence when you have clearly been fired from your last job. Instead, take responsibilities for the actions that led to your termination and show your prospective new employers what you have changed as a result. A failure to learn from past mistakes will only lead to more of the same results in the future.

Rebuild Your Bridges

Past references are an important part of getting your next job. Just because you’ve been fired doesn’t mean you won’t be able to use them as references in the future. In fact, reaching out to the person who fired you can provide valuable insight into what went wrong and how you can correct it. You will also be able to repair some of what can be a valuable relationship to help you get your next job. Avoid getting defensive during the conversation and treat it as a learning process. In most cases, terminations aren’t personal and relate to your performance. If you apologize and extend the olive branch, you may still leave with a positive reference you can use.

Talk to Human Resources

Many employers have adopted new policies for giving references due to the number of law suits that have occurred due to bad references. For this reason, it’s important to find out what your previous employers will reveal to prospective employers. Many employers will only allow human resources to provide dates of employment and ending salary numbers. Ask whether your manager is allowed to provide a reference. If the manager isn’t allowed and you find out they have spoken poorly of you, costing you a new job, contact human resources again to let them know about the issue. If you are respectful and emphasize the fact you are trying to move on and provide for your family, most human resource departments will be willing to help.

Getting fired from your last job doesn’t have to mean it will be difficult to get a new one. It all comes down to your C-level personal branding and writing a professional resume that increases your chances of getting hired, despite the fact you were terminated from your last job. These tips, along with working with executive resume writing services, will help you get the results you’re looking for.

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Choose the right references when writing a professional resume.

Writing a professional resume requires choosing the right references.

Job references can be an important part of the interviewing process. While it’s no longer necessary to include them when writing a professional resume, you should still be ready with a list of people potential employers can contact. Choosing the right individuals can make a difference in your C-level personal branding, allowing you to make a great impression.

A Recent Boss

It may be tempting to list the boss from your first job because he felt you did a great job and appreciated your work ethic, but depending on how long it’s been, he may no longer remember you well enough to give a good reference. Choosing a more recent boss is your best option. If you choose not to include your current boss, be ready to explain why, even if you simply don’t want him to know you are looking for a new job.

Co-Workers

People with whom you work can be a great asset to your resume. However, it’s important to make sure you choose the right individual. Just because you are friendly with a co-worker doesn’t make them a good professional reference. Choose someone who knows your job and can vouch for your value to the business.

Volunteer Organizations

Though not always related to your career choice, you can include someone from an organization for which you volunteered. Resumes that get you hired often list volunteer opportunities that show your dedication and your willingness to help others. Those who volunteer their time for a worthy cause are more likely to go above and beyond in the workplace as well.

An Early Odd Job

Babysitting and lawn mowing are common jobs for teenagers, even before they’re old enough to legally work. If you are still in touch with individuals for whom you performed these tasks, ask them if it’s all right to use them as a reference. This type of reference can do wonders for your C-level personal branding. It shows a strong work ethic and reliability.

Professors

You spent time in college training for work in your chosen field. One of the benefits of the time put in at a university can include using professors in your field as a reference for future jobs. These individuals know you on a personal level and can speak to your character better than many other references. However, be sure you choose one who knows you as a person, rather than just another face in the classroom.

Resumes that get you hired may not include references with the rest of your information, but they are still an important part of getting hired. As you create your list, make sure you choose the right people and let them know you are using them as a reference. No one is able to give a good reference if they aren’t prepared.

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Start your career right with c-level personal branding.

C-level personal branding can play a major role in your ability to start your career.

When you hear the term, branding, what comes to mind? Most people think of businesses and the logos and slogans they use to capture the attention of their target audience. In the world of resumes and cover letters, your C-level personal branding isn’t all that different. When writing an effective resume, you need to focus on how you present yourself and what information you share with prospective employers.

Audit Your Online Profiles

Today’s employers are more likely to look at your online presence before they make a final hiring decision. For this reason, you need to make sure your online profiles reflect the personality and assets you have to offer. Make sure you only share information that reflects positively on you. In addition, you can set your Google account to alert you whenever your name is mentioned, allowing you to monitor content outside of your control.

Gain Exposure

The Internet has made it easier to network with people who can help you reach great heights. However, these individuals aren’t likely to find you. You need to take the right steps to reach out to them. Websites like LinkedIn can help you connect with people who can help you attract the attention of recruiters and companies looking for individuals in your field. Creating content that will appeal to these individuals will also help you to capture their attention.

Put Your Expertise Out There

You have a lot of experience and skills that can benefit the right company. Resumes and cover letters are a great way to share this information, but you can further showcase your expertise by securing a website and posting regular content relating to your industry. When employers see you maintain a website that shares valuable information about your field, they are more likely to see you as a valuable asset to their company. This method of C-level personal branding can serve a number of purposes, including helping you find the perfect job.

Be Yourself

There’s no one else in the world just like you, and it’s up to you to show prospective employers why you are the one they need. When writing an effective resume, many individuals concentrate on showing prospective employers what skills and education they have to make them an asset to the company. However, hiring isn’t just about finding someone with the right skill set; companies are looking for someone who fits into the company culture. For this reason, it’s important to be yourself.

Resumes and cover letters are designed to showcase your skills, but they can also enhance your C-level personal branding. When you’re searching for a job, you need to let businesses know who you are and why you would be an asset to their company. Writing an effective resume and following these tips will increase your chances of obtaining the job you’re looking for.

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Get attention with the help of a professional resume writing service.

A professional resume writing service can help you get attention.

How you represent yourself with your personal branding can play a significant role in whether you are hired. However, it’s not all about hiring a professional resume writing service to write resumes that get you hired. In some cases, you need a executive recruiter who will be by your side to help you make the right career move. There are several reasons you should consider working with a recruiter as part of your job search.

There’s No Charge to Job Seekers

Recruiters are typically hired by employers to help them find the ideal candidate for any open positions. These recruiters have the experience and skills necessary to determine which applicants are the best fit for the job requirements. This means most recruiters are available free of charge to the job seeker. The person you hire will be paid by the employer for their services.

Access the Hidden Job Pool

Not all companies advertise their open positions where anyone can see and apply for them. In these situations, having a resume that gets you hired won’t produce results because you can’t see the available position. C-level recruiters often have a list of unpublished job openings they can provide so you can apply to ones in a much smaller pool of applicants.

An Inside Job

Not only do recruiters have access to job openings that aren’t published elsewhere, but they often have close working relationships with companies in their field. A professional resume writing service may be able to make your resume look great, but if you can’t get it in front of the right people, you won’t get hired. A recruiter can help you go over your resume and make changes that will make you more appealing to the job for which you are applying.

Avoid Overexposure

It may not seem like a bad idea to spread your resume as many places as you can, but distributing your resume in too many locations can have a negative effect on your ability to get the job you want. Employers look for individuals who may be in high demand but aren’t catering to a dozen other similar companies at the same time. When you use a recruiter in your job search, employers won’t stumble on your resume on a job board and pass you by because you may already be entertaining other offers. Instead, they will feel like you are an exclusive opportunity, boosting your chances of landing an interview and the job.

C-level personal branding is an important aspect of writing resumes that get you hired, but it’s not the only factor. Working with a executive recruiter can provide a number of benefits that can give you the advantage in the often-competitive business world. A recruiter can take some of the anxiety out of your job search and increase the chances you will find the right career path more quickly than working on your own.

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