What NOT to Include on Your Resume

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Phrases Not to Include on Your Resume
Your resume is valuable real estate. It needs to be kept as brief as possible while highlighting your past employment and skills in the best possible light. Therefore, it’s important to include the best of the best on your resume.

While it’s important to include as much positive information as possible, it is equally important to know what NOT to include on your resume. Because your resume is one of the most valuable marketing tools in your job search, you want to ensure that you are including information that is relevant to your career goals, and removing anything that does support those goals.

References

Don’t include the line “references available upon request.” It’s completely pointless and a waste of space. Both you and the hiring managers know that you are going to produce references simply because in 99 out of 100 cases they will be required.  Just be sure that you have a reference page, formatted to match your resume, ready to hand over at the interview.

Generic Statements

Statements such as “highly skilled,” “reliable,” or “energetic team player” are generic and really don’t put you in a positive light. If anything, they show you as someone who hasn’t really considered the alternative. If you have been doing anything at all, then you have skills. Show what you have done with those skills instead of using a phrase that means nothing. “Energetic team player”?  What else is there, a lethargic loner? Being energetic and a team player are expected work traits and shouldn’t be highlighted on your resume. It strikes a hiring manager as trying to fill blank space on the page. The same is true of “reliable.” If you aren’t reliable, then you will not last long.

Writing a great resume isn’t difficult if you create a document that matches the needs of the employer, as well as effectively communicates your skills and expertise. Look at your resume the way an employer would and update it accordingly.

You own the space and you need to make it work for you, and your job search.





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Written by - Visit the website to hire executive resume writer Erin Kennedy, CERW, CPRW

Erin is an internationally renowned certified resume writer specializing in professional and executive level resumes and career services.

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One Response to “What NOT to Include on Your Resume”
  1. Josh Tolan says:

    Great post! These are all great tips for the common phrases you can feel free to leave off your resume. You only have a limited amount of space to tell your professional story on your resume and you want to make sure you make the best of it and avoid cliches. A great way to do so is to record a video resume, where you can back up some of the things you’re claiming on your resume like your passion and communication skills.

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