6 Common Fears Experienced When Facing a Career Change, and How to Tackle Them: Embracing the Spooky Season of Transition

Job Search
Two corporate professionals trying to navigate career change trapped on an elevator with zombies trying to attack on Halloween

Ah, the crisp rustle of leaves underfoot ๐Ÿ‚, the aroma of pumpkin spice lingering in the air ๐ŸŽƒ, and of course, the Halloween candy ๐Ÿซ๐Ÿฌ and scary movies ๐Ÿ˜ฑย โ€“ itโ€™s that magical time of the year again. To fully embrace the spooky season, I wanted to venture into the eerie realm of career change, unraveling the six most common fears that tend to send shivers down the spines of many professionals I encounter. Here, I will illuminate the path, offering strategies on how to vanquish these fears and embrace the transformative power of change. So let’s dive in. What are six of the most common fears experienced when facing a career change?ย 

Career Change Fear #1:ย  The Unknown

The fog of uncertainty often cloaks the road to career change, paralyzing even the most daring souls. The best way to combat the unknown: education and research. Delve into new career paths, explore diverse industries, and identify your transferable skills. There are many online resources out there to help you discover different executive roles, helping you narrow down exactly what you are looking for. Additionally, if you still find yourself wandering aimlessly, career counseling and professional resume services can help point you in the right direction.

Career Change Fear #2: Financial Instability

๐Ÿ‘ป A specter that frequently haunts the minds of transitioning professionals is the fear of financial instability. Worry not brave traveler! To fight this fear, we can borrow from the Boy Scouts’ simple but important motto: Be Prepared. Plan meticulously; budget wisely for the transition period. Evaluate your skills โ€“ the treasure trove of expertise acquired over years can often unlock doors in unexpected places. Seek industries that value executive experience, where the skills you have are exactly the ones for witch (see what I did there? ๐Ÿ˜‰) ย they are searching.

Career Change Fear #3: Rejection

In the eerie silence of job applications, the fear of rejection can echo loudly. Quell the fear with the power of self-assurance. Build your confidence, craft resumes that speak volumes about your capabilities, and sharpen your interview skills. If youโ€™re not sure where to start, we are happy to be your ally, ensuring your skills shine brightly, banishing the shadows of doubt.

Career Change Fear #4: Skill Obsolescence

Amidst the rapid evolution of the job market, the fear of skill obsolescence lurks. Itโ€™s a valid concern, and anxieties on this subject abound among many of my clients. How do we fight this? Knowledge. Enroll in online courses, gain certifications, and embrace professional development. Once accomplished, shout your accomplishments from the rooftops! Enhance your resume and LinkedIn profile with these newfound skills.ย 

Career Change Fear #5: Work-Life Balance Disruption

It can be hard to break away from a job that is no longer satisfying your career goals but has allowed for a healthy work-life balance. In the labyrinth of career change, maintaining that balance can feel like a daunting task, especially for executives navigating a career change. The key is to remember to manage your time efficiently, set boundaries, and seek the support of loved ones.ย 

Career Change Fear #6: Losing Professional Identity

As the career metamorphosis begins, the fear of losing oneโ€™s professional identity and status can cast a daunting shadow. But remember: change often means growth! Embrace the change; let it be your cocoon of transformation. Focus on personal and professional growth, recognize that identities can evolve, and draw inspiration from success stories. Change also doesnโ€™t mean you have to leave your โ€œold selfโ€ behind. Build on the solid foundation youโ€™ve already formed, never forgetting the challenges youโ€™ve already overcome and the skills youโ€™ve gained while facing those challenges.ย 

As we bid adieu to the spine-chilling tales of career change fears, remember this โ€“ the night may be dark, but each fear is but a flickering candle waiting to be reignited. Embrace the challenges, seek guidance, and let your fears be the stepping stones to your triumphant career change. Dare to change, for in the embrace of transformation, youโ€™ll find the true essence of your professional self. So, my friend, step boldly into the unknown, and let the adventure of your career change begin โ€“ for in every shadow, thereโ€™s a chance for brilliant illumination.



Why Rejection And Failure Are Part of the Executive Job Search Process

Job Search
Discouraged woman looks at computer after getting rejected while on executive job search

Embarking on the journey to secure an executive-level position is no small feat. It’s a path paved with ambition, years of hard work, and an unquenchable thirst for success. However, this journey often takes unexpected turns, including rejection and failure. In this post, I want to delve into a reality that many executives face but rarely discuss openly – the inevitability of rejection and failure in the executive job search process. I like to remind my clients that though these challenges feel like roadblocks at the time, in the long run, they are essential stepping stones toward their ultimate career goals.

The Reality of the Executive Job Search

The executive job market is an arena of fierce competition and unique demands. It’s a realm where qualifications, experience, and expertise are merely the entry tickets, not the guarantees. Executive roles often come with stringent requirements, and the search for the perfect fit can be daunting. The reality is that rejection and failure are not exclusive to those who lack skills; they can happen to even the most accomplished professionals. Recognizing this is the first step in navigating this complex landscape.

Understanding and Managing Rejection

Rejection isn’t just about professional setbacks; it can take a toll on your emotions and confidence. It’s natural to feel disheartened and discouraged when you’re turned away from a position you’ve set your sights on. To cope with rejection and maintain confidence, consider strategies like seeking support from your network, focusing on your accomplishments, and practicing self-compassion. These emotional coping mechanisms are vital in the executive job search journey. Keep an accomplishments journal (or create one) with your wins and if you’re feeling down, review the successes you’ve had.ย 

Dealing with these emotions is no easy task – rejection can be a bitter pill to swallow! But it’s also a powerful teacher. When coveted executive roles slip through your fingers, it’s essential to view them as an opportunity for growth. Rejection often comes with valuable feedback, shedding light on areas where you can improve. Whether it’s a missing skillset or a specific qualification, these insights can guide your efforts to become a stronger candidate.

Embracing Failure While Searching For Executive Roles

Failure is often portrayed as the opposite of success, but in reality, it’s an integral part of the journey towards it. Many (if not all) successful executives have faced setbacks and failures along the way. These experiences, while painful, can serve as stepping stones to greater achievements. They offer lessons that cannot be learned any other way. The old adage โ€œsometimes you just have to learn the hard wayโ€ is true for a reason. Embrace that and remember that youโ€™re not alone in this experience.

Navigating failure also helps develop your resilience. The ability to bounce back from adversity stronger than before is a quality that every executive needs in their toolkit. When failure knocks on your door, resilience is your shield. Strategies for building resilience include cultivating a growth mindset, seeking support from mentors, and staying focused on your long-term goals. Resilience doesn’t eliminate failure, but it equips you to rise above it.

Strategies for Navigating Rejection and Failure

Continuous Learning and Adaptation

Staying current in your field is not only a professional necessity but also a strategic move to reduce rejection. The job market constantly evolves, and executives who adapt to these changes are more likely to succeed. Continuous learning and adapting to market trends can make you a more attractive candidate. Additionally, having a plan for continuing education regardless of the amount of rejection faced while on your executive job search will give you a purpose and boost your confidence.ย 

Seeking Feedback and Mentorship

After a rejection, don’t hesitate to seek feedback! Understanding why you were not selected will provide valuable insights for improvement. Take that feedback and add it to your plan of continuing education. Mentorship also plays a critical role in gaining guidance and perspective from experienced professionals who have navigated similar challenges. Reach out to people who have been in your shoes and come out the other side. LinkedIn is a great tool for connecting to those in executive roles for guidance.ย 

Perseverance and Tenacity

In the face of rejection and failure, perseverance is your most valuable weapon. Keep your eyes on your goals, stay motivated, and remember that setbacks are not permanent! The ability to persevere is often what sets successful executives apart from the rest.

In the executive job search process, rejection and failure are not signs of inadequacy; they are part of the journey. Embrace them as opportunities to learn and grow. I understand the complexities of the executive job market and am here to support you every step of the way. Always remember this: rejection and failure are not roadblocks; they are the stepping stones that will lead you to your next executive success.

How to target your resume for your specific role or industry

Resume KeywordsResume Writing

Resumes are not one size fits all.

In other words, if you’re looking for an HR job, your resume should be targeted to that particular HR role.

When I was hiring, I was pretty specific in my position description for a part-time customer service person. I loaded it with job-specific customer service keywords.

I was shocked–and a little annoyed– by the applicants who applied: a CFO, a UX coder, an insurance claims specialist, an early childhood educator, an IT consultant, and more completely unrelated to my posting (with not a speck of customer service experience in their resume.

HR managers, hiring managers, and recruiters talk about this often–when applicants DON’T tailor their resumes to the position listed.

If you’re not sure what should be on your resume, always look to the job description. It’s full of keywords and it tells you exactly what they need.

For example, if you are a finance executive what things should you put on your resume?

Financial executive resumes are different from other executive resumes in several ways. Here are a few key differences:

  1. Emphasis on financial expertise: Financial executive resumes should highlight the candidate’s financial skills and experience, including their ability to analyze financial data, make strategic financial decisions, and manage budgets and financial forecasting.
  2. Technical skills: They may want to include a section highlighting technical skills such as financial modeling, risk management, and experience with accounting software.
  3. Education and certifications: Education and certifications are important for financial exec positions. Candidates should include information about their degrees, professional certifications, and any relevant coursework. Additional professional experience is important as well.
  4. Results-oriented: Financial executive resumes should highlight specific achievements and results, such as improving profitability, increasing revenue, reducing costs, or leading successful mergers and acquisitions.
  5. Industry knowledge: A career in finance should demonstrate a deep understanding of the financial industry, including regulatory compliance, financial reporting requirements, and industry trends.
  6. Leadership and team management: They are often responsible for managing teams, so the resume should highlight leadership skills, team-building experience, and a track record of successful management.

So, what are some keywords a finance exec might use? Again, look to the job description. Depending on the job you may see any of these:

  • Financial analysis
  • Strategic planning
  • Budget management
  • Forecasting
  • Risk management
  • Investment analysis
  • Financial modeling
  • P&L management
  • Cash flow management
  • Accounting principles
  • Taxation laws
  • Regulatory compliance
  • Auditing
  • Corporate finance
  • Treasury management
  • M&A
  • Capital markets
  • Leadership
  • Team management
  • Communication skills

Make sure to incorporate these keywords appropriately in your resume, highlighting your relevant skills and accomplishments. However, avoid stuffing your resume with too many keywords as it may come across as inauthentic or spammy. Instead, focus on using relevant keywords that accurately describe your skills and experience.

ATS or Hiring Manager–Who should I write my resume for?

Executive ResumesResume Writing

Does the thought of writing your resume leave you confused?

Not sure who will be reading this? An AI (ATS) or a human?

It can feel stressful to know what to write, who to write for (recruiters? hiring managers?), what keywords, etc., especially when you arenโ€™t sure exactly what an applicant tracking system does.

I’ll explain it in a nutshell.

ATS (Applicant Tracking Systems) are software programs used by employers to filter and sort through resumes to find the most qualified candidates for a specific job.

ATS typically look for the following elements in a resume:

Keywords: ATS scan resumes for specific keywords and phrases that match the job description. These can include job titles, technical skills, certifications, and other relevant terms that demonstrate your qualifications and experience. What words do you notice over and over in the job description?

Formatting: ATS prefer resumes that are well-organized and easy to read. To ensure your resume is ATS-friendly, use a simple and consistent formatting style, including headings, bullet points, and white space. Columns donโ€™t work here as ATS reads left to right (like a book)โ€”it doesnโ€™t stop at the column.

Relevant Work Experience: ATS look for candidates with experience that closely matches the requirements of the job. Make sure your resume highlights your most relevant work experience, including job titles, dates of employment, and key achievements.

Education and Training: ATS also look for candidates with the required education and training for the job. Make sure to include your degree(s), certifications, and any relevant coursework or training programs you’ve completed.

Applicant Information: ATS also scans for basic applicant information such as name, contact information, and location. Make sure to include this information in a clear and consistent format at the top of your resume.

Knowing which keywords to add is perplexing to some of the candidates I talk to.

One way to know if your resume has enough keywords for ATS is to carefully review the job description and compare it to your resume. Look for the specific skills, qualifications, and experience that the employer is seeking and make sure to include relevant keywords and phrases throughout your resume.

Here are some tips to ensure your resume has enough keywords for ATS:

Use exact phrases: Use exact phrases from the job description wherever possible. If the job description calls for “project management experience,” include that exact phrase in your resume instead of a similar phrase such as “managed projects.”

Use variations of keywords: Use variations of keywords and phrases throughout your resume to demonstrate your familiarity with the industry and the specific job requirements. For example, if the job description calls for “customer service skills,” also include related terms such as “client service” or “customer support.”

Include relevant industry jargon: If there are specific technical terms or jargon commonly used in the industry, make sure to include them in your resume. This helps to demonstrate your familiarity with the industry and the specific job requirements.

Don’t stuff your resume with irrelevant keywords: While it’s important to include relevant keywords and phrases, don’t stuff your resume with irrelevant keywords. This can make your resume look unnatural and may actually hurt your chances of passing through an ATS.

Test your resume: Some ATS offer a “resume optimization” feature that can analyze your resume and provide feedback on whether it contains enough keywords for the job. Alternatively, you can test your resume by submitting it to a free online resume scanner that checks for ATS compatibility.

Something to keep in mind is that even though itโ€™s important to write a resume that works with ATS, itโ€™s also important to write for people.

It’s equally important to ensure that your resume is readable and appealing to human recruiters as well as ATS. This means using clear, concise language, storytelling, and formatting that makes your qualifications and experience easy to understand. Your resume should also highlight your unique skills and accomplishments in a way that captures the recruiter’s attention and stands out from other candidates. It should tell your story.

To strike a balance between ATS and human readability, consider tailoring your resume for each specific job application. Start by reviewing the job description and identifying the key skills and qualifications that the employer is seeking. Then, incorporate those relevant keywords and phrases throughout your resume while also crafting a compelling narrative that showcases your experience and achievements.

Similar to ATS, hiring managers typically look for the following key elements in a resume:

Relevant Experience: Hiring managers want to see that you have relevant work experience that demonstrates your ability to perform the job duties required for the position. Highlight your most relevant work experience and quantify your accomplishments with specific achievements and results.

Skills and Qualifications: Highlight your skills and qualifications that are directly relevant to the job. Be specific and provide examples of how you have used these skills in previous roles.

Education and Certifications: Include your educational background and any certifications that are relevant to the position. This helps to demonstrate your qualifications and expertise in a particular area.

Achievements and Accomplishments: Use specific examples to demonstrate your achievements and accomplishments in previous roles. Quantify your results wherever possible to demonstrate the impact you have made in previous positions. Numbers, numbers, numbers. Add metrics when possible.

Relevant Keywords: While not as critical as with ATS, it’s still important to use relevant keywords and phrases from the job description. This helps to demonstrate your familiarity with the industry and the specific requirements of the position.

Clarity and Readability: Hiring managers want to be able to quickly and easily scan your resume for the information they need. Use a clear and consistent formatting style, including headings and bullet points, to make your resume easy to read and understand. Keep the important info on page oneโ€”the top half of the page.

In summary, hiring managers look for a combination of relevant experience, skills and qualifications, education and certifications, achievements and accomplishments, relevant keywords, and clarity and readability in a resume. ATS seeks these things as well.

The job description offers a treasure trove of keywords and helps make the writing process so much easier. If you’ve done those same skills list them. Both the hiring manager and ATS will be seeking them out.

 

What is read more? Your resume or your LinkedIn profile?

LinkedInResumes

I would say at least in more than half of the conversations I have with job seekers, they end up asking me if they should have their LinkedIn profile written, or just their resume?

What do hiring managers read the most? The resume or a LinkedIn profile?

The answer is BOTH.

Resumes and LinkedIn profiles are both important because they serve different but complementary purposes in the job search process.

A resume is a formal document that is used to summarize a job candidate’s work experience, education, skills, and other qualifications for a specific job application. It’s usually submitted to an employer as part of the application process.

LinkedIn, on the other hand, is a professional networking platform that provides a digital presence for job seekers. It allows candidates to connect with potential employers, recruiters, and other professionals in their industry, as well as showcase their work experiences, skills, and accomplishments through their profile.

Together, a strong resume and LinkedIn profile can help a job candidate to present a complete and compelling picture of their qualifications and expertise to potential employers.

The resume provides detailed information about a candidate’s experience, while the LinkedIn profile provides context, endorsements, and network connections that help to bring the candidate’s qualifications to life.

A resume helps a job seeker to do the following four things:

  1. Summarize work experience and qualifications: A resume provides a concise overview of a job seeker’s work experience, education, skills, and other qualifications, making it easier for employers to quickly assess a candidate’s suitability for a job.
  2. Stand out from other candidates: A well-crafted resume can help a job seeker to stand out from other candidates by highlighting their strengths, achievements, and unique qualifications.
  3. Make a positive first impression: A professional-looking and well-organized resume is crucial in making a positive first impression on potential employers.
  4. Target specific job opportunities: A job seeker can tailor their resume to match the requirements and qualifications listed in a specific job posting, making it easier for them to show how their experience and skills align with the needs of the employer.

A LinkedIn profile helps a job seeker to do the following four things:

  1. Build a professional network: LinkedIn allows job seekers to connect with potential employers, recruiters, and other professionals in their industry, which can lead to job opportunities and career growth.
  2. Showcase expertise and achievements: LinkedIn provides a platform for job seekers to highlight their work experience, skills, and accomplishments, helping them to stand out from other candidates and demonstrate their value to potential employers.
  3. Stay up-to-date in the industry: LinkedIn is a source of news and information about the job seeker’s industry, allowing them to stay informed about the latest trends and developments in their field.
  4. Expand their visibility: By having a strong LinkedIn profile, job seekers can increase their visibility and be discovered by potential employers and recruiters, even if they are not actively searching for a new job.

A resume provides a formal document that summarizes a candidate’s work experience, education, skills, and qualifications for a specific job application, while a LinkedIn profile provides a digital presence that allows job seekers to connect with potential employers, recruiters, and other professionals in their industry, showcase their expertise and accomplishments, and expand their visibility.

Having both a well-crafted resume and LinkedIn profile helps job seekers to present a complete and compelling picture of their qualifications and expertise to potential employers, increasing their chances of being considered for job opportunities. By having both, job seekers can also target specific job openings, stand out from other candidates, make a positive first impression, and stay up-to-date in their industry.

In conclusion, having both a LinkedIn profile and a resume is crucial for job seekers as they serve different but complementary purposes in the job search process.

What do you think is most important? What gets more interest– your resume or your LinkedIn profile?

 

 

 

Is your resume relevant for the role you want?

Resume Writing

Imagine you brought home a carton of milk, opened it for your cereal, started to pour, and out came Diet Coke.

It’s not that you don’t like Diet Coke.

It’s just that you ๐˜ฏ๐˜ฆ๐˜ฆ๐˜ฅ๐˜ฆ๐˜ฅ milk.

One of the most common frustrations I hear from recruiters and hiring managers is that their candidate’s resumes don’t match the position they are interviewing for.

Do you apply to jobs that may not be in your wheelhouse but apply anyway?

If I’m being honest here, this is a pet peeve of mine.

Recently, I put an ad on LinkedIn. I was looking for a Client Success Manager. Part-time, 20 hours a week. Must have customer service experience.ย  All of these things were spelled out crystal clear in the position description.

I got hundreds of responses within a 36-hour window.

Guess how many had ANYTHING to do with client success, client services, office administration, etc? About 20. The rest were… everything else. I spent four days scrolling through the applicants and reading every resume from top to bottom. Annoyed that so many were obviously not a fit is putting it mildly.

Guess how many had ANYTHING to do with client success, client service, office administration, etc.? About 20. The rest were… everything else.

There were two CEO’s, a CFO, high-tech, a couple of teachers, sales reps, recruiters, business development, process analyst, and so on. And about 90% of them wanted a full-time role.

None of them mentioned any of the skills I listed–and I searched their resumes for something, anything similar.

I even put a little note at the bottom to email me directly with a copy of the resume. After all, this is a small company, it’s not Google. I had the time to be thorough and review each applicant’s resume.

Guess how many people emailed me their resumes?

Go ahead and guess, I’ll wait.

Wrong.

SEVEN people emailed me their resumes. SEVEN.

I won’t vent here about not reading directions on an application, even though I really, really want to. ๐Ÿ™„I’ll save that for another rant post.

Keep in mind that a recruiter or hiring manager will only take a few seconds to view your resume. If they use ATS, the ATS will pick out appropriate matches as well.

So, if you really want to impress a hiring manager, read the entire position description and send them a resume that speaks to the role they need to fill. If your skillset doesn’t match what the position description is asking for,ย  you may want to look at other open positions.

If you have some transferrable skills that will work for the role you want, make sure to add them to the career summary, bullet points, and within each role.

Here are some things to consider when drafting your resume:

โœ… ๐—ฅ๐—˜๐—Ÿ๐—˜๐—ฉ๐—”๐—ก๐—–๐—˜. First, do you have the experience the position asks for? If yes, add examples of what you’ve done. If not, don’t fake it and add it to the resume. Leave it off and lead with other experiences.

โœ… ๐—ž๐—˜๐—ฌ๐—ช๐—ข๐—ฅ๐——๐—ฆ. Examine the description and notice the words they use over and over. This tells you that those words will most likely be keywords ATS will look for. Does your resume have those keywords? If not, add them.

โœ… ๐—ฆ๐—ž๐—œ๐—Ÿ๐—Ÿ ๐—ฆ๐—˜๐—ง. What skills do you offer the role? Each of us has a unique skill set we bring to the job. Great at relationship building? Expertise in vendor negotiations? Specialize in cyber security? Make sure it’s added to your resume. If you have skills from your current role that can transfer, add them. What did you do in your prior role that will work for this new role?

โœ… ๐—ฉ๐—”๐—Ÿ๐—จ๐—˜. What value do you offer? How can you help the company? If you are an ๐—ฒ๐˜…๐—ฒ๐—ฐ๐˜‚๐˜๐—ถ๐˜ƒ๐—ฒ, in what ways have you achieved success? Use quantitative examples where possible. What awards have you received? What results have you produced? How did you help them increase revenue, cut costs, etc.?

To sum it up, making sure your skill set matches the position description is a must. If you think you have transferrable skills for the role, add those to the document. The more you can set yourself up as a candidate with similar skills, the better your chance is of being invited to the interview.

Don’t Give Up The Job Search Just Because The Holidays Are Near

Job Search

I’ve been talking with job seekers lately who ask whether they should job search right now or wait until after the New Year.

The holidays are upon us and many worry it isn’t a good time.๐ŸŽ…

But–there are many benefits to continuing on with your job search.

๐ŸŽ„ ๐‚๐จ๐ฆ๐ฉ๐š๐ง๐ฒ ๐›๐ฎ๐๐ ๐ž๐ญ๐ฌ. Companies have new budgets in place to entice and hire #candidates. They are still #hiring and actively looking.

๐ŸŽ„ ๐Œ๐ข๐ง๐ข๐ฆ๐š๐ฅ ๐œ๐จ๐ฆ๐ฉ๐ž๐ญ๐ข๐ญ๐ข๐จ๐ง. Your competition is less since many people decide to hold off until the new year. Plus, you will impress companies with your dedication and commitment.

๐ŸŽ„ ๐Œ๐จ๐ซ๐ž ๐ญ๐ข๐ฆ๐ž. Things are winding down at your company due to the holidays and end of the year, so you have more time to focus on #job search

๐ŸŽ„ ๐๐ž๐จ๐ฉ๐ฅ๐ž ๐š๐ซ๐ž ๐ข๐ง ๐ ๐จ๐จ๐ ๐ฆ๐จ๐จ๐๐ฌ. People are generally in better moods around the holidays. More time off, seeing family and friends (via remotely this year, unfortunately), shopping, and reflection. It’s a perfect time to reach out and start a #conversation.

I asked career professionals on LinkedIn what their thoughts were on the subject. Read what they have to say:

Hannah Morgan, Job Search Strategist, Career Sherpa:ย  November and December are great months for conversations and you are so right, many companies are either trying to fill roles that are still vacant now or line up candidates to hire Jan. 1. Don’t put on the brakes!

Ed Han, Talent Acquisition Geek, Recruiter:ย  As a corporate recruiter: let me reassure your readers & followers that if the job posting is up, I AM READING APPLICATIONS.
Scheduling interviews may take longer, but if it’s open, that hiring manager has funds earmarked towards that hire and is anxious to use them, because they’ll get asked if they really need the position or not by their boss, or their boss’s boss.

Nicole Reyes, Sn. Technical Recruiter: I’ve noticed that many hiring managers want new hires to start in January of the new year, which means they’re willing to schedule interviews with candidates this time of year. It’s worth your time to search for a position during this period, even if the search is a bit slower because people will be out of the office more with the holidays.

Greg Roche, Career Transition Coach: Take your holiday card list and see who you can connect with in person. Send them a card too, but use this list as a way to get back in touch with people who are important to you, but likely haven’t talked to in a while. This helps you practice connecting and you never know where it might lead Erin.

Andrea Yacub Macek, Top Job Expert to Follow, Career Coach:ย  The best time to network, market, and job search is when you are ready to do so in your season of life. If you need to take a break, do so, and if you want to continue networking or job search, do so; there are always benefits. These are some significant reasons you askedย Erin Kennedyย to continue instead of stop.

Meg Applegate, Resume Writer, Hinge Resume: The holidays are a great time to check in with your network. Start conversations now, even if after the new year is your goal. You never know what can come of it,

Sarah Johnston, Executive Resume Writer, LinkedIn Branding: Great reminder, Erin Kennedy. Some managers have โ€œuse it or lose itโ€ budgets and have positions that need to be filled before the end of the year.

Adrienne Tom, Executive Resume Writer: If a company really needs an employee, it doesn’t matter what time of year it is — they will be looking. Which means, you should be too.

Bottom line: Don’t give up. Keep looking. This is a GREAT time of year to look for a job. ๐ŸŽ„

 

 

 

Job Search Plans

Job Search

Doesย #cold calling a hiring manager cause you to hyperventilate? ๐Ÿ˜ฑ


You’re not alone!

If you have a solid plan in place it can reduce anxiety, build your confidence, and increase your chances of success.

Here are some quick tips to get you there:

โœ” ๐‘๐ž๐ฌ๐ž๐š๐ซ๐œ๐ก the company. Learn about their mission, goals, and the type of employees they hire.

โœ” ๐ƒ๐ž๐ฏ๐ž๐ฅ๐จ๐ฉ your questions. Write them down. Read them out loud until you feel confident.

โœ” Use your ๐๐ž๐ญ๐ฐ๐จ๐ซ๐ค. See if you have a connection that would make a recommendation to theย #hiringย manager. Someone who can drop a little seed in the mind of the person you’ll be talking to.

โœ” ๐Ž๐ซ๐ ๐š๐ง๐ข๐ณ๐ž your data. Use a spreadsheet to track phone numbers, dates, messages left, and notes.

โœ” ๐–๐ซ๐ข๐ญ๐ž your script. Bullet point info to include experience and type of position you are seeking.

โœ” ๐๐ซ๐š๐œ๐ญ๐ข๐œ๐ž. This will increase your confidence. Record yourself. Make your main points in one minute. Practice your elevator pitch.

โœ” ๐“๐ข๐ฆ๐ž ๐จ๐Ÿ ๐๐š๐ฒ. Determine the best time to call, when people are less busy.

Having a plan increases your confidence, helps you feel prepared, and increases your chances of landing a job that much quicker.