best resume writing serviceIt’s completely healthy and natural to take a step back and evaluate your current job situation occasionally. This is especially true if you used to be happy going to work every day, but now your attitude has changed for some reason. The knee-jerk reaction is to immediately start looking for another job, and possibly even resign from your current position abruptly when things aren’t going well. However, before you visit the best resume writing service to help brush up your resume prior to resigning, consider these three questions.

What Do I Not Like About My Current Job?

Sometimes things aren’t really as bad as they seem, but sometimes they are. Taking a step back and truly identifying why you aren’t happy can help you determine whether the issues are fixable. You may just need to talk to your boss about a particular issue that’s been bugging you for a while. And if it’s been a long time since you’ve received a raise or a promotion, consider bringing it up in a professional way. Don’t simply jump into updating your LinkedIn profile to declare your intentions to find a new job until you know exactly why you don’t like your current job anymore.

Is My Salary Comparable To Similar Executives?

The feeling of being underpaid is difficult. Sometimes you would feel better if you didn’t know what other executives with similar experience make. When your executive bio is similar to another executive’s, you naturally expect to be paid a similar salary. Get an idea of comparable salaries by looking at job boards and networking with others. If you truly are being underpaid, discuss the matter with your boss if you like everything about your job other than the salary. If you’re viewed as a valuable executive, you could get a significant raise to stay.

Am I On The Right Path To Achieve My Goals?

You should have both short-term and long-term goals as an executive. If you’ve been stuck with the same job responsibilities for a while, but have higher aspirations, then it may be time to look at a different company to give your executive bio a boost. However, some businesses move slower than other businesses, so if you’re getting valuable experience, you may consider sticking around to see where it takes you. Of course, as with any position, you have to be happy in order to do a good job and put yourself in a better position for advancement.

If you’ve answered all of these questions and still feel like you need to resign, Professional Resume Services is here to help you. We provide the best resume writing service, no matter what your current situation is and what your goals are. If you’re in need of any type of assistance in relation to your executive job search, feel free to contact us at any time.

LinkedIn profile developmentSearching for a new job while being employed presents plenty of challenges. You have to be extra careful when you’re conducting your search, because you don’t want to burn any bridges or seem untrustworthy. The best executive resume writers can help tailor your resume to be confidential, so it won’t be as easy to identify you on a job board. There are many secrets to conducting a confidential executive job search, and here are a few of them we would like to share with you.

Be Creative With Networking

The hidden job market is the best way to go about conducting a secret job search. Nowadays, you don’t have to post your executive resume bio online to get a job. By networking at professional events or through LinkedIn, you can find out about jobs you didn’t even know were available. Even volunteering or being involved in your community can lead to new opportunities, so being active can move your job search forward as well.

Use LinkedIn Carefully

If you don’t have your LinkedIn settings updated appropriately, your connections may be able to see every change you make. Chances are your co-workers, or even your bosses, may be included in your LinkedIn network. You definitely don’t want them to see you update your resume or profile to indicate you’re looking for a new job. When you’re working on your LinkedIn profile development, alter your settings to ensure the wrong people don’t see any changes you’ve made.

Make Your Resume Private

As mentioned, the best executive resume writers know how to effectively make a resume confidential. By using the term “confidential applicant” instead of using your name, you’ll avoid showing up on your current employer’s search for a new candidate. Also, not using your company’s name anywhere on the resume is important. These are just a couple ways you can make your resume private, and a potential employer will understand why you’re doing it.

Conduct Your Job Search On Your Own Time

Nothing is worse than conducting a job search on company time. If your current boss finds out, there’s a chance you could be fired. And if your potential employer finds out you’re conducting your search on company time, they may think you’ll do the same to them and not offer you a job. Do yourself a favor and only send out your executive resume bio when you’re not on company time.

Professional Resume Services is here to help you conduct a confidential executive job search. We have the best executive resume writers to help you in this area, so you can feel confident sending in your resume to potential employers. Feel free to reach out to us at any time if you need other secrets to pulling off a confidential job search.

executive resume bioMany executives forget a job isn’t theirs until they sign on the dotted line to become employed with the company. Receiving a job offer is great, but some mistakes could lead to the offer being withdrawn. You’ve worked so hard to get your executive resume bio in shape to get recognized, land an interview and ultimately get a job offer. Here are some of the common mistakes you need to avoid both before and after receiving a job offer.

Not Being Honest

Don’t tell your interviewer you have another job offer elsewhere if it isn’t true. Similarly, don’t lie about the salary at your current position or previous position. Employers have the right to look at this information for verification before they make a job offer. If you’re caught in a lie, they may question your entire executive resume bio and not give you an offer.

Not Keeping Your References Informed

Your references on your executive resume could be critical in getting you a job. However, any of the top resume writing services will tell you to always keep your references informed when you send in a resume. Employers often call those references, so you don’t want them to be surprised when it happens. You want your references to be prepared so they can discuss your past work most effectively.

Negotiating Too Much or Too Early

Negotiation is part of the interview process for executives. However, there’s a time and place for negotiating, and doing it too early or too often could make an employer uncomfortable enough where they won’t offer you the job. You are entitled to fair pay and benefits, but there has to be some give-and-take as well.

Social Media Blunders

Potential employers almost always look at social media profiles because it gives them insight as to who you are. Use a LinkedIn profile service to get your Linkedin profile cleaned up from a professional standpoint. Also be careful not to post any photos or commentary that could be offensive or otherwise hurt your chances of not looking and sounding professional. Social media is a valuable tool, but it can also be extremely costly when not used appropriately.

Professional Resume Services is one of the top resume writing services in the industry. Not only can we help you write an effective resume to boost your chances of landing an interview, but we also have valuable tips about various stages of your executive job search. Feel free to contact us at any time if you’re struggling with your job search.

Executive profileSeeking a new c-level position takes a similar approach as searching for a job of any caliber. Without the proper preparation and going through the necessary steps, you may find your search to be more difficult than it needs to be. No matter how polished your executive profile may be, you still have to follow the same steps as everyone else to be considered for a high level job. Here are some of the most common mistakes c-level executives make when seeking a new position and how to avoid them.

Misunderstanding The Process

Whether you’re searching for a c-level position or an entry level position, the job search and hiring process will be very similar. You have to do research about the company before applying for a job there. Having all of the skills and qualifications doesn’t guarantee you’ll get the job. You still have to sell yourself and show how you add value to any given company in order to stand out.

Not Having The Right Strategy

It may have been a long time since you last looked for a new c-level position, so the same strategy may not apply. The first thing you should do is optimize your LinkedIn profile. Many recruiters will find candidates on LinkedIn, whether they are searching for a job or not. Furthermore, you can almost guarantee a hiring manager will look for your LinkedIn profile as soon as they receive your resume. If your strategy is to just send out as many resumes as possible, you’re heading down the wrong path.

Not Building Relationships

The power of networking is instrumental in landing your next c-level position. Building solid relationships is more important than building a solid executive profile. The old saying, “it’s not what you know, but who you know,” applies to c-level positions as well. Thinking your resume speaks for itself is another common mistake executives make.

Making it About You, Not the Company

Companies don’t necessarily care about you when they are hiring; they care about what you bring to the table. Many executives try to make themselves sound good, whether it’s on their LinkedIn profile or an in-person interview. However, what you really need to do is show how valuable you will be to the company based on your experience. The information and qualifications are the same, but the way you present everything makes a huge difference.

Professional Resume Services is here to help you avoid common mistakes to give you a better chance at landing your next c-level job. Whether you need help optimizing your LinkedIn profile, updating your resume or anything else throughout the job search process, feel free to reach out to us at any time.

Executive resume service

There are many reasons why you may be thinking about moving to a new industry for your career. You may have simply burned out on your current career, landed your dream job or just feel like you need a change. No matter how excited you may be about the switch, it’s only natural to feel a little stressed because of the transition. However, before you spend hours writing and rewriting your executive bio to make it sound attractive to a new industry, here are some tips to consider.

Know Which Skills Transfer Over

You’ve developed many skills in your current job, but some of them may not be useful in your new industry. If you aren’t sure which skills naturally fit with your new industry, check with an executive resume service. They work with people with all different backgrounds to find careers in multiple industries. They will be able to help you identify your pertinent skills related to your new industry, so you can write your executive bio accordingly.

Network and Volunteer

The more people you know in your new industry, the easier time you’ll have finding the job you desire. When you don’t have some of the specific skills and experiences for your new industry, it doesn’t matter if you have the best executive resume format or not. However, going out of your way to network and volunteer to make solid business connections can overshadow some of the lack of skills you may have in the industry you desire.

Take Your Time to Find The Right Fit

Before you leave your current industry, make sure your finances are in good enough shape to allow you to take your time with your transition to a new industry. The last thing you want to do is add to your stress level because you’re running out of money. You may end up settling for a job you don’t want just to pay the bills.

Take your time as much as you can. Visit an executive resume service to make sure you have the best resume possible to hand to recruiters. By taking your time and being patient, you’ll be more satisfied with the end result and the process of getting there will be less stressful.

Professional Resume Services is here to help you make a smooth transition to a new industry if you’re looking to do so. Writing a good executive bio will help, but there are many other factors to consider as well. Feel free to contact us at any time if you need help with your executive resume or need answers to any career-related questions you may have.

Any job seeker knows how important networking is. However, even a minor mistake can lead to major consequences in your job search. Taking executive level personal branding seriously is important, since hiring managers look for that when talking to candidates face-to-face. When you’re spending your free time networking to find a new job, try your best to avoid these mistakes to help yourself stand out to interested companies.

Expecting a Job Offer Right Away

Many people go to a networking event and expect to walk away with a job offer. This is simply unrealistic. It’s one thing to be confident in yourself and your abilities when meeting someone for the first time, but you shouldn’t be so bold as to basically ask for the job on the spot. A key to personal branding for senior level managers is to get to know the hiring manager and other top executives within a company. They are likely taking their time with hiring someone, so you should do the same and make as many connections within the company as you can.c-level personal branding

Talking About Yourself Too Much

No one know more about you than you, so it’s easy to fall into the trap of talking about yourself nonstop. When you feel the urge to talk about yourself, ask an intuitive question instead. Ask your connection how they got into their job, how they like it, what the culture is like and other questions that show interest. Not only will this clearly show your interest in the job, but it will also give your c-level personal branding a boost.

Not Spending Enough Time on Personal Branding

Speaking of c-level personal branding, you need to be doing more of it. Everyone believes they are qualified for certain jobs. And most of those people will talk about the same qualifications. But instead of talking about how you are qualified, talk about the value you bring to the table. Companies are more interested in learning how you can help them, rather than only knowing what skills you have.

Overlooking The Importance of a Polished Resume

Your executive bio is usually the first thing a recruiter will read on your resume. If you’re going to take the time attend a networking event, at least have your resume reviewed by a professional to ensure there aren’t any glaring mistakes. Remember these recruiters are going to talk to dozens of people at networking events, so your executive bio needs to stand out and make them remember meeting you face-to-face.

Professional Resume Services is here for job seekers, whether you need help writing an executive bio or anything else related to your job search. If you need assistance before or after a networking event, feel free to contact us at any time.

ceo interview questions

We are accustomed to any number of conventional interview questions, and everyone has their favorites. But many shrewd CEOs and executives are digging a little deeper, looking beyond what they see in a job candidates’ executive profiles, resumes and cover letters. They are asking some very unusual interview questions designed to reveal more of your personality and ensure you are the perfect fit for their company.

 

“What would you do in the event of a zombie apocalypse?”

— Ashley Morris, Capriotti Sandwich Shop CEO

 

Of course, there is no right or wrong answer here. It’s simply a fun question Morris likes to ask to see how a candidate will respond under pressure. This gives him a feel for how effectively they react without prior thought or planning, as well as insight into their moral compass and whether they will fit into the company’s culture.

 

“What’s your superpower … or spirit animal?”

— Ryan Holmes, HootSuite CEO

 

Holmes feels the response he gets to this question gives him a greater understanding of a candidate’s work habits, beyond what’s seen on an executive’s profile.

 

“On a scale of one to 10, how weird are you?”

— Tony Hsieh, Zappos CEO

 

One of the reasons Hsieh likes to ask this quirky question is to ensure the candidate is a good fit for the casual culture of Zappos. According to Hsieh, whose company values include fun and a little weirdness, it’s not really important what number you choose, unless it’s at the extreme end, such as one or ten. Whereas a one might indicate you are too conservative for his company, a ten, on the other hand might show a tendency toward being a little too weird for them.

 

“Tell me something that’s true, that almost nobody agrees with you on.”

— Peter Thiel, PayPal co-founder

 

Co-founder of PayPal Thiel values those who are not afraid to say what’s on their minds. He finds this question, though uncomfortable, helps him see how courageous a candidate can be in discussing something that may be in direct opposition to the interviewer’s opinions.

 

“What was the last costume you wore?”

 David Gilboa, Warby Parker co-CEO

 

What the candidate remembers wearing isn’t a problem. It’s more about making sure they fit in with the eyewear retailer’s relaxed environment. With core values that include adding “fun and quirkiness” into everything they do, Warby feels that even the most capable candidate would be a mistake to hire if their work style was not a good fit.

 

“Tell me about your failures.”

 Jenny Ming, president and CEO of Charlotte Russe (former chief executive of Old Navy)

 

Resumes and cover letters don’t show failures, only successes. Ming feels this question is a good test of how willing the candidate is to take a risk, and being honest enough to acknowledge when things don’t go right. The example could come from either personal or business life. What’s important is how the person handled the failure and how they overcame or moved forward afterward. The clothing store executive says the responses give her insight into how willing the candidate is to admit when something goes wrong.

 

So, to prepare, you might want to start thinking about what your super power or weirdness level is so you are ready for your next interview.

 

 

 

online authority is essential for professionals
Professional resume and executive resume services have always emphasized the importance of networking for those interested in finding a job or moving ahead in their career plans. This is because the interactions we have with others in our industries creates a background impression that job applications, resumes, and cover letters are viewed against. People see the resume, for instance, and find out more by either asking around or remembering contact.

LinkedIn is an online networking site, the biggest and most influential one we have access to in 2015. Louisa Chan is a marketing expert, and her post on Copyblogger is primarily speaking to content writers. But the 7 Ways to Build Online Authority with LinkedIn that Chan suggests are good suggestions for professionals of any industry who wish to establish authority in their field. Isn’t this what networking and moving ahead as a professional is all about? As others become familiar with our expertise, we have a voice in the field — and the more expertise that is in our voice, the more authority we have.

Seven Ways To Build Authority on LinkedIn

Here is a quick look at these great suggestions:

  1. complete your profile
  2. compose content for distribution
  3. convene in relevant LinkedIn discussion groups
  4. connect with your peers
  5. communicate in a personal way
  6. continue to improve
  7. commit to your production schedule

All of these are ongoing projects. Even the completion of your profile is never ending, because if you are doing the other things, there will be more to add to your profile. And each time you add to the content you produce, your voice is being heard as an expert in your field.

If nobody knows you are an expert, you are invisible. One of the first things that a potential employer or the HR person deciding on your promotion, will do is see what you have to say about your expertise online. This is essential, whether it is original content (and there should be some original content) or a carefully curated contribution to the discussion along with your commentary.

 

predictive analytics and your career

“While not new, predictive analytics is an important factor in assessing a candidate’s fit and potential. What is new is its accelerating use in corporate America as a means to filter candidates in and out of consideration long before any personal assessment is made.” — Lou Adler

Lou Adler is a regular contributor to LinkedIn and has so much experience and authority in his perspective on the hiring process that it is worth taking the time to understand what he says about the way Big Brother is Now Determining Your Hirability. Today, a person seeking a position is filtered by all that is in their resume, and all that is in their online brand as well. There’s a list of characteristics that fit into a pattern; the pattern of the Achiever.

Here is what the “Achiever Pattern” that many companies look for consists of:

  • lower turnover with growing responsibility
  • quality of the years of experience rather than number of years
  • quickly being assigned (or volunteering) for important projects and/or teams
  • demonstrating same patterns of initiative & responsibility in every position
  • rehiring and being rehired by past co-workers
  • participation in expanding cross-functional teams

Why Are Certain Qualities Desirable?

If you look at the Achiever Pattern’s overall impression, you see someone who is willing and able to work within any setting and maximize the potential. They are good to work with, as evidenced by the fact they hire past co-workers and are hired by people who have worked with them in the past. There’s a pattern there of more than a self-centered trampling on the way to a shinier inflated ego — the achievement they consistently reach is an achievement that is good for everyone.

If you don’t have these qualities, you may be filtered out of the running before you ever get to the interview. It may be a good idea to carefully look at your resume and online presence and see how accurately they are portraying your own achievements. LinkedIn profile development has never been more important than it is today because it reveals a pattern that your next employer uses to predict your hirability.

 

how to do voice mail professionally

Are you one of the people they were talking about on NPR recently? Please Do Not Leave A Message: Why Millennials Hate Voice Mail is taking a look at the way that leaving a message is fast falling out of favor as a communication mode. You don’t have to be part of the Millennials to hate voice mail because it can be a sudden challenge you don’t do well. But there’s a problem with refusing to deal with voice mail because it is used in business all the time.

If you are searching for a job, there’s a good chance you will need to leave a voice message. If you are contacting your manager or a client, there’s an equally good chance that voicemail will be involved. The game of Phone Tag came about because of the way busy people can’t always pick up the phone and being able to text doesn’t exactly replace it.

Deal With It & Do It Right

If you know you struggle with sounding professional at the sound of the recording beep, you can learn how to deal with it and do it right. Think about the goal of your call and have a message prepared if you have to leave a voice mail. If you have to write it down before you make the call, that’s practice for the next time you need to use the skill.

The same basic rules that apply to a phone interview apply to a business call, and therefore also apply to a business voice mail.

  • Don’t make a call from a noisy environment. Go to a spot that is quiet and allows your voice to be heard.
  • It should be obvious that nothing is in your mouth, right?
  • Be prepared to state your name, phone number, the reason for the call, and repeat the name & number. Keep it short.
  • Speak clearly and don’t try to cram too much into the message. You can tell them more when they call you back.

Whether you are leaving a message for business or as part of your job search, this is one business skill that you really do need to make sure you can do even if you hate voice mail.

 

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