Post-COVID Benefits to Expect from Your Next Employer

Career & WorkplaceGuest PostsInterviewingJob Search

The COVID-19 pandemic will have lasting effects on the workforce in more ways than one. With stay-at-home orders forcing consumers to stay at home and non-essential workers to work remotely, or in a worst-case scenario, be furloughed or laid off, businesses have had to find creative ways to reel in customers and retain top talent.

For business owners, in order for your company to survive post-pandemic, you’re going to need to reimagine your benefits package to incentivize your workers to stay at your company. The coronavirus pandemic has shown many faults in our society, such as a need for healthcare, childcare, and other essential basic needs, which means finding new ways to alleviate some burdens can help bring in and retain top talent that can help grow your business.

Employees will also remember the actions you take during these unprecedented times. In order for your legacy to live on, you need to adjust to the new normal employees are expected to adapt to in the post-pandemic era. And as a prospective job candidate, it’s important to look at what companies did for their employees to help them navigate the pandemic. Whether you’re a business owner or a job hunter, these are some post-COVID benefits you should expect from your next employer.

  1. Healthcare

America is one of the only countries on the planet where citizens can get health coverage through their employers. While not mandated by law, depending on the size of your company, providing employer-sponsored healthcare to your staff will not only allow them to get the help they need when they’re sick but will show you care about their basic human needs.

One aspect of life the coronavirus has brought to light is that far too many people don’t have adequate healthcare. COVID exposed the American healthcare system’s fragility when millions of workers were left without a job during a deadly pandemic. With that said, employees are going to search for companies that offer comprehensive healthcare plans that will keep them safe and stable, even during unexpected medical emergencies.

As an employer, it’s best to find a provider that offers broad coverage rather than narrow, as it will appeal to a larger pool of workers and provide more options. After all, no one’s body is the same, so the more healthcare options your employees have, the better. The last thing an employee wants is to be stuck with a tough decision to get care that they can’t afford.

  1. Child care

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced millions of Americans across the country to abide by stay-at-home orders and quarantine until the virus is under control. While many states are reopening with certain measures in place, such as social distancing and mask-wearing, we’re not back to the normal we were once so comfortable with. One of the major disruptions that came about the pandemic was school and daycare closures, leading many students to learn remotely from the comfort of their homes. The problem? What do parents with essential jobs do?

Many families had to make hard sacrifices to determine how to take care of the children while still going to work and making money. Some had to make the difficult decision of quitting their job altogether, while others had to rearrange their schedules or find a new job where they could be home with their children while they learned.

Post-pandemic, many workers are going to look for employers who offer some sort of child care assistance to maintain a better work-life balance. This can take a few forms, such as having an on-site daycare facility where parents can drop their kids off, providing monetary assistance to cover expensive daycare costs, or giving workers flexible schedules that allow them to drop off and pick up their children when daycare facilities and schools close. Offering child care assistance will go a long way for many working parents. It will help ease stress and allow them to save for other life expenses, such as purchasing a new home, building a trust fund, buying a car, or going on vacation.

  1. Student loan assistance

Many employers require applicants to meet certain qualifications in order to be hired for a job. One of the most common qualifications is holding a bachelor’s degree, or in some cases, a master’s degree or beyond. While business owners need workers who have the education and knowledge to perform certain tasks in their job, it comes at a pretty hefty expense on behalf of the employee. College tuition costs are at an all-time high, and today’s students are graduating with more debt than any other generation before them.

One way to attract and retain top talent is by offering student loan assistance. And for recent grads swimming in mounds of student loan debt, finding an employer who offers student loan assistance can be extremely beneficial finance-wise.

With the coronavirus stifling the economy, many employees with student loan debt are finding themselves struggling to get by. While interest and payments have been halted on federal student loans, those with private student loans might still be required to make their monthly payments. Workers need assistance, and they need it now, so offering some sort of monetary aid will go a long way. Even better, the one-time stimulus bill includes tax benefits for employers who offer student loan debt assistance, meaning you can save a significant amount of money on your taxes when Uncle Sam comes knocking at your door.

Wrapping up

We’re still in the midst of an unprecedented global pandemic, which has had crippling effects on the economy and workers around the world. While businesses have had their own fair share of challenges during these times, one way to bounce back and recover is ensuring employees’ needs are met.

Employees who feel valued by their employers are often more productive and have higher levels of satisfaction, which means taking care of these needs is a win-win for both parties. These three post-COVID benefits are just some of the benefits you can expect from your next employer. While this list is non-exhaustive, it serves as a good starting point for what to expect from an employer.

Samantha Rupp holds a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. She is the managing editor for 365 Business Tips as well as runs a personal blog, Mixed Bits Media. She lives in San Diego, California and enjoys spending time on the beach, reading up on current industry trends, and traveling.

 

7 Skills to Acquire During Quarantine That Can Boost Your Resume

Career & WorkplaceGuest Posts

If you’re one of the millions of Americans who’s been under some level of COVID-19 quarantine restrictions over the last several months, you’re probably starting to feel a little restless these days. You’ve organized the garage, participated in virtual happy hours, and run out of stuff to stream — now what?

Whether you’re on the job hunt after becoming unemployed or you’re just on a mission to find something bigger and better, you’re in the right place! In this post, we’ll show you some ways to resolve both your boredom and ramp up your resume during quarantine. From certificates to skills, read on to find out the top seven things you can do to boost your resume without ever leaving your couch!

  1. Web Design and Management

When employers think about the qualities of a good employee, the words “driven,” “self-motivated,” and “passionate” often come to mind. So, what better way to impress a potential employer than by showing off some self-taught skills? With a little help, of course…

In the digital age, experience with web design and management is an invaluable skill worth reaching for. And thanks to the same technology, it’s easier than ever to learn how to build, design, and launch a website at your own, self-guided pace. What’s more, your practice site can become your very own living portfolio where you can host your resume, work samples, contact details, social media links, and more.

Here are some of the top-rated online web design courses and platforms to choose from:

  • Webflow University
  • UDemy
  • SkillShare
  • Coursera

If you want to build from templates rather than code your way from the ground up, you might check out user-friendly platforms like Squarespace, WordPress, and Wix.

  1. Visual Design

If you’re looking for a career in the creative realm, a great way to boost your skills is to get hands-on with design. Photo editing, illustrating, and designing page layouts are just a few of the things you can learn using the Adobe Suite program.

  1. Language

Knowing how to read, write, and speak in another language is always a great skill to have, no matter what kind of work you do. In fact, many workplaces will pay employees more if they know a second language, especially if it’s a language commonly used in the region.

What’s more, learning a foreign language opens the door for more travel opportunities and could even present the option for you to work abroad if you’re interested.

Thanks to the convenience of mobile apps and increasingly easy user interface, learning a new language while you’re on-the-go or at home is fun and easy to do. Check out these popular apps to get started:

  • Duolingo
  • Babbel
  • Busuu
  • Memrise
  • HelloTalk

 ProTip: As you start to learn the foundations of a foreign language, you can start to expand your learning tools by watching foreign films or television shows, cooking from foreign cookbooks, or reading books in a new language. If you’ve been looking for ways to stay entertained during quarantine, learning a language is one of the best (and most productive) things you can do!

  1. Social Media Management

It’s no secret that social media practically runs the world as we know it these days. From Instagram and Snapchat to TikTok, Twitter, and Facebook, there’s a social network out there for everyone; there are even social networks for career seekers. Heck, you might even be a member of all of the above!

Whether you’re in the marketing and communications world or just have a passion for social media, there are plenty of ways you can leverage your social skills in the workplace. Learning how to craft custom content, engage with users, and monitor performance can open the door for new job responsibilities and give your resume the added edge it needs to make it into the final round.

The best part? There are tons of free resources out there to help you get started:

  • For video storytelling, check out Social Creators
  • For social media and digital marketing in general, try Acadium
  • For help with Facebook ads, visit Facebook Blueprint
  • To learn more about ad performance, use Google Analytics Academy
  • To learn the foundations of content marketing, check out Hubspot Academy
  • For information on scheduling content and increasing engagement, try Hootsuite Academy
  1. UX/UI

UX, or user experience, applies to a lot of different industries and professions, including web design, software development, and product design. In essence, UX is the practice of improving a user’s experience with a product, whether that means button placement or page hierarchy on a website, the functionality or packaging of a product, or some other aspect that alters how a customer interacts with a product.

Interested in UX or UI? Check out these resources:

  • DesignLab
  • Xterra
  • Career Foundry
  • Interaction Design
  1. Public Speaking

Almost nobody likes to do it, but nearly every employer is looking for someone who’s good at it. That’s right, we’re talking about public speaking. No matter what field you’re working in, chances are, there is some element of public speaking necessary in one way or another, whether that’s through in-house presentations, project proposals, PR, or just team collaboration.

If you’re not ready to jump up in front of a classroom of people, learning the foundations of public speaking online may be your best bet! Coursera, Forbes, Udemy, and LinkedIn Learning all offer virtual courses in public speaking.

 Bonus: Not only will public speaking skills set you up for success within a workplace environment, it can also help you gain the confidence and knack to nail your next interview.

Wrapping Up

While life in quarantine seems to only drag on as the months move by, there are plenty of productive things you can do with your time. By working to build your professional skills online, you can ramp up your resume, increase your value as a professional, and keep yourself occupied and engaged.

Feel free to use these seven tips and resources as a guide to get you started, and don’t forget to share your experience in the comment section!

Sophie Sirois is a writer based in San Diego, CA, currently writing content for 365businesstips.com. With her Bachelors of Art in Strategic Communication behind her, Sophie began working in the content marketing sphere and has been crafting unique, informative, and click-worthy content ever since.

Is There Really Ageism in the Workplace?

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If you are a 50+-year-old worker, you have probably experienced some ageism at work. Whether you have been passed over for a promotion, perceived as someone who isn’t current on the latest trends, or not included in the water cooler discussions, negative perceptions about seniors are common.

But how do you know which are true and which are assumptions? If you want to address them, you need to know what people actually think. ResumeLab polled 900+ Americans to find out just how ageist we are. You can look at the complete results on their website, along with the graphic showing the highlights. Here is what they found:

Though about 50% think older workers are resistant to change and are less healthy, independent studies actually show this is FALSE.

People (45%) think older workers aren’t interested in additional training or career development. This actually TRUE.

Younger workers think older workers look down on them, 41%. Not enough evidence to support either way.

About 40% think older workers are more expensive to train or retrain. Primarily TRUE.

With this information, if you are an older worker, it is imperative that your resume dispels these stereotypes. You must communicate your ability to be current, up on the latest trends, a life-long learner, and willing to mentor others.

Older Workers Study

 

ResumeLab is a resume advice site with over 250 detailed guides. See our experts featured in Business News Daily & TechRepublic, Inc.

 

10 Interview Questions You Should Be Prepared to Answer

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Wouldn’t it be awesome if you had all the interview questions your potential employer was going to ask you in your next job interview?

Well prepared and confident, you could then give the recruiter an element of surprise, wowing them with your wit, experience, and charm. The truth is, we already know what they are going to ask you. That’s because a vast majority of employers tend to ask very similar questions that follow an objective evaluation system.

While we don’t recommend giving a practiced response to each interview question (please don’t), spending some time getting comfortable with what you might be asked can set you up for success. That said, here are the ten interview questions you should be prepared to answer.

  1. Tell Us About Yourself

Often asked at the start of each interview, this question is commonly used as an icebreaker. How you answer it will make your first impression.

Don’t give your full employment or personal history. Instead, give a brief, concise description of who you are and your key qualifications, skills, and experience. Make sure to tailor your answers to the role you’re being interviewed for. For example, if you’re being interviewed for an accounting role, you could explain how you became a CPA without a bachelor’s degree. While it’s possible to become a qualified certified public accountant without a degree, it’s a challenging process with stringent experience requirements. Describing your accountancy journey can show your determination to succeed.

  1. Why Do You Want to Work for this Company?

When a recruiter asks this question, they not only want to know why you want to work for them, but also what you know about the company. Do your homework to find out as much information about the company as possible. When answering the question, frame your answer in a way that will portray your strengths and how passionate you are about the work they do.

  1. What Are Your Weaknesses?

Hiring managers ask this question to test whether you’re qualified for the job. They want to know whether you can cope with challenges and learn new tasks. The trick here is to structure your answers around positive aspects of your skills in a way that will seemingly turn weaknesses into strengths.

  1. What Is Your Greatest Strength?

Your greatest strength, in this context, is a skill that’s valuable to the company. On that note, don’t choose something unrelated to the job, like mastery in Solitaire (unless it’s a game tester role). Instead, pick a skill they need help with most. For example, if the recruiter is a realtor, you could point to impeccable negotiation skills as your greatest strength.

  1. Where Do You See Yourself in 5 Years?

This question aims to figure out if you’re able to set realistic goals. If you plan to work with this company, make sure you understand the organization’s hierarchical positions and the potential for career growth the company offers. Focus on your career goals, and ensure the answer you give aligns with the position you’re interviewing for.

  1. Why Did You Leave Your Previous Job? 

The essence of this question is to test your character (honesty, perseverance, etc.) Even if you left under challenging circumstances, do not say anything negative about your previous or current employer. Instead, focus on what you want to achieve in the future.

  1. How Do You Respond to Working Under Pressure?

The interviewer wants to know how you handle workplace stress. What do you do when things are not going according to plan? The trick here is to reveal your problem-solving skills. Give an example of a time when you were faced with a stressful situation and how you successfully managed it.

  1. What Is the Most Difficult Situation You Have Faced at Work?

Similar to the question about how you handle workplace stress, you will want to exemplify your impeccable problem-solving skills here.

  1. What is Your Greatest Accomplishment?

Consider this question an invitation to brag about what you have achieved in your career. Much like the question about your greatest strength, the answer to this question should align with what the employer needs. Focus on your recent career achievement and demonstrate how it can be of value to the company.

  1. What Are Your Salary Expectations?

This can be a tricky question to answer. You don’t want to underprice yourself or place yourself out of a job offer. Research the company well to know where they peg their employee salaries, then quote a figure that is commensurate with your skills.

Once you’ve mastered these interview questions and prepared yourself accordingly, you’ll be one step ahead of the competition.

Author Bio:  Bryce Welker is an active speaker, blogger, and tutor on accounting and finance. As the Founder of Crush the CPA Exam, he has helped thousands of candidates pass the CPA exam on their first attempt. 

 

5 Resume Hacks for 2020 Job Seekers

Guest PostsJob Search

Finding that first job after graduating or starting a career change can be one of life’s greatest challenges. Getting a solid job in the industry you want to work in, however, can open doors to success that lasts a lifetime. That makes landing a strategic job worth all the effort you put into it.

That effort starts with your resume. Putting together your resume, whether it’s your first time or just the first time in years, can feel daunting. However, it doesn’t have to be. With a few clever tips, tricks, and savvy hacks, your resume will communicate your talent and experience clearly to all potential employers.

Get ready to wow at your next job interview with these 7 simple hacks that you can use on your resume today.

The structure should depend on the stage of your career

First, it’s important to think about the overall structure of your resume. Where should each section go — what sections should you have in the first place? First, it’s a good idea to make a distinction between an early career resume and a mid- or late-career resume.

What’s the difference? In an early career resume, you probably don’t have too much work experience to brag about. If you do, good for you, you busybody! Either way, it’s likely that the most impressive achievement you have accomplished so far is your schooling. Whether that’s an associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s degree, or technical schooling certification, if you’re looking for your first job, it’s smart to put your degrees or certificates first on your resume.

  • Takeaway: if you’re early in your career, your resume should lead with an Education section.

Those whose school days are long behind them, and who have been working in the career world for some time (maybe 7 years or more) should think about leading with their job experience. It’s likely that you have spent a good amount of time seriously developing your leadership, communication, management, and teamworking skills while on the job by that point in your career. Sure, your schooling is pretty impressive, but employers will want to know what you’ve done since you graduated.

  • Takeaway: if you’re in your mid-to-late career, think about putting your Work Experience first, then your education later.

Once you’ve settled on the order of the general sections, it’s time to think more specifically about how you’ll lay out your work and schooling experiences.

Make sure your resume tells a story — chronologically

Employers reviewing applications often don’t have a ton of time on their hands to sort out confusingly laid-out resumes, so one way you can make it easy for them (and give yourself a more comprehensive look) is by laying out your resume chronologically.

In each section, Education and Work Experience, be sure to lead with your most recent position. Employers are probably more interested in your work managing a team of programmers for five years than the internship you had as an undergrad.

Once you’ve correctly laid out each section chronologically, it’s time to think about the story that your resume tells. Remember, that reviewer is on the clock, and you want to communicate to them as concisely and effectively as possible what value your experience and education will bring to their company.

  • Pro tip: 

If you’re applying to jobs in a few different industries, consider having different resumes for each one. You may have a variety of experience that’s relevant more to one industry than another, and your resume is your chance to highlight that.

Depending on the type of job you’re applying to, it’s okay to spin each position you worked for to best match that role. The truth is that, in most jobs, you’re likely performing a variety of responsibilities, so it’s totally okay to highlight the aspects of your past work that tells the most coherent and engaging story about your schooling and work experience so far. That brings us to our next tip.

Always highlight achievements from past experiences

Your resume is your highlight reel. You want potential employers to see clearly and quickly how you will add value to their company or organization. When crafting each entry describing past work experience, it’s likely not worth it to list out everything that you did at each job. Sure, it’s great that you can answer emails or do the basics of what your past jobs required of you, but that’s not the stuff that will set you apart from everyone else in the pile of resumes.

So, rather than simply describing the duties of your past jobs under each entry, list 2 to 4 noteworthy accomplishments you made while working there. Perhaps you solved a really tricky programming puzzle that no one else on your team could. Or maybe you wrote an article that brought more views to your site than any other for months. Maybe you were able to settle a difficult disagreement among coworkers and got your team back on track. Whatever it is, highlight it on your resume; it makes it clear how much value you can contribute to your new workplace.

Devote a section specifically to your skills

Next, it’s a smart idea to create a section for your skills. The way you decide to incorporate it design wise (more on that below) is up to you, but commonly, people have a box that lists their skills toward the bottom of the resume, or along the side.

Skills are concrete abilities you have that you will be able to start using the day you step into your new role. Maybe it’s web design, or using engineering software, or writing search engine optimized marketing copy. Whatever it is, employers want to know if you have the skills for the job. Your skills section is the place to make that completely clear.

Get creative with design, but keep it professional

Resumes have advanced beyond the classic Word document in Times New Roman font. Sure, for some employers (think law firms or accounting agencies), that’s still the gold standard. However, for many employers, having a creative resume with beautifully designed elements is a great way to stand out.

Luckily, there are plenty of free or inexpensive templates available online. So, even if you’re not a professional graphic designer, you can still have a gorgeously designed resume, laid out perfectly to draw potential employers’ attention directly to the parts of your experience you most want to highlight.

Resume design and layout isn’t an exact science, but by having the right structure and content, you increase your chances of landing that dream job you’ve always wanted.

At the end of the day, writing a resume can still be a daunting task. Trying to write objectively about yourself can be difficult. If you need help in crafting that resume to sell yourself to a potential employer, you may want to consider hiring a professional resume writer who has years of experience developing resumes to highlight all your achievements and skills.

Samantha Rupp holds a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration and is the managing editor for 365businesstips.com. She lives in San Diego, California and enjoys spending time on the beach, reading up on current industry trends, and traveling.

The Ultimate Guide to Accepting a Job Offer

Guest PostsJob Search

If you have been in an active job search for a while, or even if you are just starting out, when you finally get that job offer, your tendency is to “jump” at it, sometimes without really giving it much thought. There are many reasons for this. You may think that another offer will never come, you don’t think you are really deserving of a job, or you really do think it is a great offer. Whatever your reason for grabbing at the offer, you need to give yourself a moment to pause, take a step back, and think through some things before accepting the offer. Here is a guide to follow when you have received that job offer to help you process whether this is the job to take or not.

The Ultimate Guide To Accepting A Job Offer

Rich Diaz is President of Advanced Resources, an office staffing agency headquartered in Chicago, IL. He has more than 20 years of experience in the industry and focuses on helping people in the consulting, staffing and direct hire space.

Job Hunting: Best Practices for Today’s Job Market

Guest PostsJob Search

A fortunate few never actually look for jobs: they are recommended by colleagues or recruited by former co-workers. For the rest of us, here’s a toolbox of best practices to make job-hunting easier and more productive.

Personal Branding is Part of the Process

  1. DO have a recently-updated resume. Have it reviewed and reworked by an expert.
  2. DO have a recently-updated LinkedIn profile with a clear, professional-looking headshot.
  3. DO make sure the dates and titles on your LinkedIn profile match your resume.
  4. DO ask for recommendations from those who know you and your work well.

Online applications are changing.

Let’s say you are a pharmacist and you spotted a LinkedIn job posting that looked like a perfect next role, but there’s a catch – you need your LinkedIn profile updated. Forbes wrote that more and more companies are asking to include a link to LinkedIn profiles. It is wise that before you start applying for an online job posting, your own profile should be updated too.

 Where to Begin Your Search

  1. DO pick 5-10 companies you admire and for whom you think you’d like to work.
  2. DO your research online on each company, find a common connection, and ask for an introduction. LinkedIn is a great resource for this.
  3. DO invite people in these companies for a quick cup of coffee near their office. Say something like, “I’d love to hear what you like about working at X. Can I buy you a quick cup of coffee?”
  4. DO ask people you trust for a recommended recruiter who can help you.

 Networking for Your Job Search

  1. DO let friends and family know you’re looking for a new job.
  2. DO attend Meetups in your field of expertise.
  3. DO look for and join LinkedIn groups in your profession.
  4. DO expand your personal network by taking part in volunteer activities. Make sure to choose a cause that you truly care about.

How to Use Company Websites

  1. DON’T rely only on applying to jobs online unless your skills are in high demand.
  2. DON’T regurgitate your entire resume into your cover letter if you’re using one. Keep it simple.
  3. DO try to find an advocate inside the company as well as applying online.
  4. DO tailor your resume to the job, highlighting the most important skills.

New to the search. 

A jobseeker or maybe a new graduate may be searching for better employment. The perfect fit to get the right connection may be to check job boards online, especially for those who are looking in the finance field. Right now, this is a booming industry with an array of jobs for job seekers. Finance Jobs wrote that it helps if seekers explore their options to get the job that fits their skills.

 Stay the Course

  1. DO look for a job before you need one. 411 is easier than 911.
  2. DON’T get impatient. Depending on your salary, it can take 6-10 months to find the next right position.
  3. DO take consistent action so you feel empowered.
  4. DO take good care of yourself physically and emotionally.

Looking for the right job is tough, but it gets better. 

Once you’ve dealt with a couple of bumps while job hunting, you will eventually reach your goal of finding that next job. Though it doesn’t stop there. Beginning a job, whether you are new to the field or not, still takes adjustments. Pitfalls are intimidating in a new environment, says Psychology Jobs. Remember this: the velocity of your search should be the same as when you have a job.

 Adding Velocity to Your Search

  1. DO find ways to help others along the way.
  2. DO assume that things are working out for the best, keeping a positive outlook.
  3. DO stay curious and open-minded. That job that doesn’t seem to be a fit could end up being the best one in your career.
  4. DON’T allow yourself to become bitter, angry, or desperate. These attitudes are a repellent, and people pick up on them, even when they can’t pinpoint what it is about you that is off-putting.

Your job search can be a trial, or it can be an interesting and exhilarating adventure. By deciding to take the long view, asking for help along the way, and refining your job-hunting skills, you’ll be giving it the attention it deserves. Happily, your results will reflect this.

Post written by Katherine Davis for ProfessionalResumeServices.com

 

Top Tips and Techniques for A Successful Job Search

Guest PostsJob Search
c-level personal branding
c-level personal branding

Searching for a job is a crucial part of your professional career. It isn’t just about simply submitting a copy of your résumé to a recruiter and then waiting for a call. Because of the ever-growing influx of job seekers everywhere and the impact of the internet in our society, the process of job searching has changed a bit. Job searching nowadays is online and network-based. It’s a matter of using the resources you have at your disposal to get hired. And if you don’t have enough weapons on your arsenal, then you will have a tough time landing a job. If you’ve just hit another dead-end on your job search, then consider another plan of action. Here are some top tips and techniques for a successful job search to help you in crafting a job search strategy.

Take a Path to Self-discovery

First up, you must discover yourself. Do a detailed self-analysis to determine your skills, interests, achievements, ambitions, values, and potential. All of these are factors essential in finding the right job for you. Once you have found out what you really need and want, then it will be smooth-sailing from there. The next steps rely on what you find out in this process.

Adapt Your Résumé

Take as much time as you need to focus on writing a tailored résumé specifically targeting the job(s) you wish to apply for. Make sure that every important detail is mentioned clearly. Give the recruiter a chance to know why you are the best candidate for the job. Remember that most online job hiring posts can get pretty crowded, particularly a high paying job with good benefits, so the recruiter should be able to identify the skills you define at a glance on your résumé.

Find the Right Match

Find a shoe that fits. Since you have already discovered your needs and wants, it will be easy. Follow your interests, values, and skills to find the appropriate job to apply for. Do the necessary research and learn about the companies that you are interested in. See which ones have a suitable job offer that checks off the boxes on the list of your self-discoveries.

Be Proactive in your Approach

The normal thing to do after you’ve sent out your applications is to wait for a response from the recruiters. Do not do that. Although there is some truth to the saying “Good things come to those who wait,” you have to remember that we are living in a modern world. Instead of waiting, go out there and go after the things that you want.

Capitalize on Your Network

As cliché as it sounds, being able to “name drop” on your résumé or cover letter can elevate your application to the top of the pile or close to it. Make the best out of the network that you have to land a job. Reach out to former colleagues, team leaders, or supervisors to see if there is a job vacancy that they are aware of. If you just got out of school, you can ask your family members or friends if they can recommend you to a company.

Track Your Job Search Processemployment

The good thing about recruitment nowadays is that it’s done online. In the era of smartphones, it’s easier to keep track of your job search activity and applications. Keep tabs of all the applications you’ve sent. This way you’ll know which ones to follow-up one, what responses you’ve received, etc.

Set Your Goals

And last but not least, remember to set your goals, weekly or daily. This allows your mind to be an active participant in your job search. Make sure that you set attainable and measurable goals, which you can look back on in the future as a way to track your progress.

Author’s Bio: Rosette Monell works as a human resource personnel in an Asian firm. Aside from her job, she’s also a freelance writer who talks so passionately about public relations, different work ethics, and culture. On her free days, she likes to spend time alone with a good book about career building in one hand and a warm cup of tea in the other.