“Remodeling” Your Career in 2022

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Today, while mindlessly browsing through social media, I came across an article containing a list of home trends that “are on their way out”.  Since I have just recently updated several areas of my home, I was intrigued and moved forward with reading, hoping that one of my remodeling projects wasn’t on the “out” list. I had only read a few snippets of the article when my mind wandered back to work, and I thought about what types of job search and resume trends have also been sent to pasture over the years? The following are some of the “ins/outs” to be thinking about as you embark on your next career “remodeling” project.

Your Resume:

In: Career Summary

Out: Objective

Starting at the top of your resume with the word “Objective” that tells the reader what you are “seeking” in your next career move is a big no-no, and OMG, so bland and boring. Just don’t. Instead, craft a compelling, leadership-focused, and keyword-saturated career summary that packs a punch and pulls the reader in wanting to learn more about you.

In: Accomplishments

Out: Daily job responsibilities

While you were hired to do certain tasks, those are not all that should be on your resume. Today’s resumes need to be accomplishment- and not task-focused. Use your career history section to show readers the impact you made in your past roles. Did your efforts result in revenue generation? Improvements in efficiency/productivity? Sharing the results of your work on your resume only enhances the reader’s understanding of the potential you have and the value you can offer in future roles.

 

Your Online Persona:

In: Presence on LinkedIn

Out: No presence on LinkedIn

LinkedIn is the world’s premier professional networking site for a reason – it works. Whether you’re actively seeking a new job or just trying to build your brand and connect with peers in your field, LinkedIn is where you need to be. Sign up for initial services is free, and if you need additional features and can afford them, LinkedIn has them ready for you. Be sure you fill out all relevant sections to build your profile, and make your content engaging so that it builds your brand appropriately and markets you for you jobs in your field.

 

Your Job Search Acumen:

In: Networking, Recruiters, Resume Distribution

Out: Sitting by the phone

So many of our clients tell us that they aren’t getting calls for interviews. So, we ask, what are YOU doing to put yourself out there as a viable candidate? Just applying for a job doesn’t always do the trick. You need to apply, follow-up, and keep looking until you start hearing back from companies and actually have interviews set up. Even if you get an interview scheduled-that doesn’t mean you’re going to get the job. It’s up to you to keep applying, networking, etc. until you land your dream job. Sitting by the phone day after day waiting for a call from the one company you applied to will only result in frustration and more than likely, no further along in your job search. Find a recruiter, network on professional sites like LinkedIn, and just get yourself out there. If you don’t know where to find a recruiter on your own, find a company that offers a resume distribution service where your resume can be sent out to literally thousands of recruiters in a matter of minutes.

YOU control the pace of your search and the number of places you apply. Make a list of companies and track when you applied, if you heard back, interview schedules, etc. If you are unemployed, your job search should be treated as a full-time job and deserves focus and time to get you to the next level.

 

Where to Find Jobs:

In: LinkedIn, Networking, Online Job Boards and Employment Sites

Out: One source shopping

Don’t just peruse your local newspaper (although many still do have a “Help Wanted” section) to look for jobs. Go online! Talk to your colleagues, family, and friends. Ask if they know of openings! Look on well-known job search sites and see what’s out there. Join groups and set-up alerts to be notified when a job that matches your skills/qualifications becomes available. LinkedIn has their own “Jobs” section to peruse. Use it to see what is available in your field/area. Have a specific company you’re targeting? Go directly to their website-you still may be redirected to another job search engine to apply, so make sure you apply per their instructions. If a job posting says “don’t call”, then don’t call. Always follow the application directions, because if you don’t, you may eliminate your candidacy up front. If you don’t have access to the internet, go to the library and use their tools/internet to look for jobs-just remember to completely logout out of any public computer so your personal information is not compromised.

 

Your Ability to Navigate the Job Market:

In: Knowing someone on the inside.

Out: What you know and what you have done will automatically get you in the door for an interview.

You have heard the saying “It’s not always what you know, sometimes it’s who you know…”? People would not still be repeating this phrase in the job market if there wasn’t some truth to it. In today’s competitive job market, many companies have a candidate in mind even before they post a job. YOU want to try to be that candidate. If you have a friend or former co-worker on the inside of a company you’re targeting, reach out to them. If they can give you some inside information to get you in the door – that’s great. Just be sure your contact has a good reputation with the company leadership. Otherwise, your credibility as a viable candidate may have just gone out the window.

As you are “remodeling” your career path, be sure the tools you are using and trends you are following are not outdated, so that you can optimize the time and effort you are putting forth as you pursue your dream job. If you are struggling with your career remodeling project, hire a professional. You would do it for your home improvement projects–why not for your career improvement projects?

 

 

How to Break Into the Entertainment Industry

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The entertainment industry is a tricky industry to break into. In fact, there’s no one, sure-fire way to get your lucky break. While some become stars in childhood, others don’t begin acting until they’re in their 40’s. Whether you want to be a musician or the next great producer, achieving your dream of working in the industry can be difficult. Luckily, there are tons of career paths to choose from to help you get your foot in the door, no matter your hopes.

At the end of the day, it’s about who you know and how hard you work to get where you want to be. Here are a few tips to help you get hired in the entertainment industry.

Understand What to Expect for Recruiting

As far as recruiting and interviewing go, the entertainment industry is slightly different than any other industry. In most cases, you’ll start at the bottom. For example, if you want to write television shows, you might get hired as an assistant, no matter how great your scripts are. This means that just out of college, you’ll likely be making less than you would at a job outside the entertainment industry, for example at an accounting firm that would hire you based on your degree, not for a lowly role that forces you to pay your dues.

When you start job hunting, you should be available to start right away. Things move fast in Hollywood, and no one is going to wait for you when there are hundreds of applicants who want the same job. This means that if you have a regular 9-to-5, you may have to quit without giving notice.

Because there’s no time to wait, the interview process will likely be quick, if you land one in the first place. Employers will likely do a pre-employment background check, so be honest when answering all the questions during an interview.

Know About the Industry

Before you start looking for a job, you should know whether you want to work in television, film, or music. This will allow you to find the best positions that help you kick-start your career instead of getting stuck in a job that doesn’t allow you to grow.

Do your homework on the major companies in the industry and know who runs them. Read as much as you can about the industry and its giants, so that when you’re quizzed, you’ll know exactly what to say.

Even if you’re not applying for jobs yet, make sure to look at job descriptions for the types of positions you are interested in. It’s always useful to learn about all the different opportunities available in the entertainment industry. If you notice any job duties that you don’t understand, write them down and research them, because you never know when you’ll come across another position with similar requirements.

Network

Much like other industries, becoming successful in entertainment is all about networking. Make a list of the people that you know personally who can help you start networking. The odds are that someone you know, knows someone in the entertainment industry.

Remember, those with reputations in the industry are often the least likely to help you get a job, because they have no idea about the jobs available for entry-level entertainment workers. That means that if your dad is friends with a director who has made a major film, they may not be your best resource starting out. Although, keep them in mind as you move up in your career.

Networking with people in your age group who are beginning to enter the industry can help you succeed. Many of them may not be going for the same types of jobs but may come across job postings that could benefit you. By staying in communication with them, you can send each other postings for openings to aid in landing a job.

Land Informational Interviews

Unfortunately, most people have no incentive to help you succeed in the entertainment industry, especially if you make big requests like helping you land a spot at a major television network. Try to keep your requests reasonable, and mention that you’re trying to break into the industry. You can ask contacts for their time to learn about their careers and experiences.

While you may not be able to land a job through this person, these informational interviews can help you create more realistic expectations and offer you tips and tricks for getting your first gig in the industry.

Make sure that the meeting isn’t just about you and asking them to help you get a job. Instead, try to learn from them as much as possible. You can, however, ask them what entry-level jobs you should be looking for if you want to be a director, actor, etc. Even if this person doesn’t know the answer, they might know someone who does.

Don’t Give Up

The entertainment industry is the hardest industry to break into; that’s why many actors and musicians refer to certain past opportunities as their “big break.” A vast majority of the people you network with won’t be able to help you, but you can learn from them. Just remember, while they may not be able to help you right now, you never know what could happen in the future.

Continuing to network and talk to as many people in the industry as possible can help you learn enough to make your dreams a reality. Landing a job in entertainment takes hard work and dedication. Make sure that you have a strong understanding of the industry and keep putting in the work until you get to where you want to be.

Matt Casadona has a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, with a concentration in Marketing and a minor in Psychology. He is currently a contributing editor for 365 Business Tips

Building a Credible LinkedIn Profile – and Using it To Move Your Career Forward

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“Are you on LinkedIn?” “Can I connect with you through LinkedIn?” “Message me on LinkedIn, and we will set up a time to talk.”  Have you heard any of these phrases in your professional conversations over the past few years? They make a point…if you aren’t on LinkedIn AND actively engaging and networking on the site, then you probably either don’t have a great LinkedIn profile, or you are not using the site and all of its features to enhance your career.

Today’s executives are constantly on the move.  If you’re an exec who is trying to increase organizational revenue, improve operating efficiency, or even build your individual value proposition for your next career move, being active on LinkedIn will benefit you in all of these areas.  When creating a strong presence on LinkedIn and using it to your advantage through connecting and networking with the right people and groups, you will find that moving your career and/or business forward is easier than you thought.  Here are a few quick tips on how to use LinkedIn to get you seen, heard, and respected in your professional circles:

Building Your Profile:

LinkedIn has so many features and options – it can truly be overwhelming.  But it doesn’t have to be!  Building your profile to effectively market you and the value you can provide must be done creatively and strategically to show that you are at the top of the game in your field.

  • Fill your profile out completely. Try to put information in as many sections that are applicable to you.
  • Add relevant credentials after your name at the top of your profile. If the job or board position you’re vying for recommends an MBA and you have the credential after your name, then the reader does not have to go through the entire profile to find out that you have achieved this level of expertise.
  • Use keywords or skills in your headline and not just a job title. This not only shows your creativity but is also a strong strategy for being found through SEO searches.
  • Be sure your profile photo is current and professional looking. Upload a customized banner to add some pizzazz to your profile – having the common LinkedIn blue banner just doesn’t cut it.
  • Don’t just write a small paragraph in the “About” Instead, use this space (2,600 characters) to introduce yourself to the reader using descriptive keywords, a few quantifiable career highlights, a bulleted list of skills, etc. You can really get some bang for your buck if you can craft an innovative and clever career summary for this section.
  • Be sure your work experience is consistent with the experience outlined on your resume (dates, titles, achievements, etc.). Inconsistencies between the two documents (yes, hiring managers do check) will either show a lack of attention to detail or that you are being less than honest. Either way, your credibility with the reader just took a nose-dive.
  • Only include relevant education College degrees and professional development or training activities are great but including your high school years are not.
  • Certifications and licenses matter, especially if you don’t have a college degree! So many people forget to add their certifications to their profiles.
  • Memberships in professional organizations can be key in showing that you have been active on corporate boards or are involved in groups within your industry. Many corporations are also interested in candidates who are service-minded within their communities, so including recent volunteer work is also good to include on your profile.
  • Including your skills is imperative! If you are unsure of the skills that are best in your field, LinkedIn will suggest some for you! Again, this is another section where you need to be creative and strategic.  Instead of “Operations”, put “Operations Management” as an entry in this section. Be sure to “pin” your top three skills so the reader can see what you excel at the most at a quick glance.

These are just a few ideas that will help you to build a strong LinkedIn profile.  However, you’re not done yet, because building a profile is only the first step in showing your credibility in your field. The next step is to be active on the site.

Networking and Engaging on LinkedIn:

You can connect with hundreds of colleagues and friends on LinkedIn, but if you are not actively engaging and networking on the site, your connections really aren’t going to be of any significance in helping to amplify your value proposition or your credibility for what you do.

  • Give and ask for recommendations. You don’t need a ton of them – but a few key recommendations from supervisors, clients, board, members, etc. can really help to vouch for who you are, your expertise, how you lead, and the value you can provide in your field.
  • Connect with key people in your field. Yes, you will have colleagues and old friends who may want to connect with you, and that’s okay.  But LinkedIn isn’t about the quantity of connections you have. It’s more about the quality of your connections.
  • Join industry-specific groups and follow their pages. Watch for posts and other publications that are of interest to you and add your two cents of expertise by commenting on the posts. If you’re in an active job search, this is also an ideal way to see what opportunities are available in your field, especially if you’re targeting a specific company.

In today’s professional (and unpredictable) world, being on LinkedIn is crucial.  Making your presence strong and credible is even more important.  Build your profile and connections, and then network and engage on a daily basis, or as often as you can to show who you are, what you have achieved, and the credibility and value you offer in your field. You won’t be sorry and may even snag the career opportunity of your dreams!

Did Coronavirus Send You to the Unemployment Line? How One Candidate is Bouncing Back

Job Search

Adam has spent the last 10 years building a successful career as an innovative Information Technology Manager for a major Tier 1 automotive supplier.  Due to the Coronavirus pandemic hindering our country’s automotive industry, Adam is currently on furlough, receiving unemployment benefits to help make up for some of his lost income, and is truly wondering if he will even have a job to go back to when his organization reopens, or if it will reopen.

While Adam knows that he is well-liked by his current employer, he still needs to prepare himself for the fact that his furlough/unemployment status may become permanent, and that he will probably have to start looking for a new job.

Knowing that he will be joining hundreds of candidates looking for new jobs in a competitive field, Adam will have to go back through his 10+ year career and start strategizing his way to a successful job search.

As we have worked with professionals like Adam for years, here are some key steps Adam will be taking as he begins a new job search:

  • Start with the basics – a resume that is written by a professional resume writer. Years ago, resumes were just a piece of paper that outlined a candidate’s career history; today’s resumes are strategically-written marketing tools that don’t just document each job worked, but are more focused on targeting specific jobs and industries, using a candidate’s accomplishments, experience, and skills. And yes, many employers will still want a cover letter to accompany the resume. Hiring a professional will save Adam time as well as will ensure that his career documents are up to par with other candidates who will be competing for the same jobs.
  • Establish a presence on LinkedIn and start networking. LinkedIn provides job seekers endless ways to market themselves, find jobs, and connect with specific companies and industry leaders. Adam needs to ensure that his profile is current, appealing, and contains the right information to position him for IT jobs in markets not only in the automotive industry, but in other industries, as well. Tip: recruiters wouldn’t be using some of LinkedIn’s premium search features if they weren’t finding quality candidates for their clients through the site.
  • Expand the search by looking for jobs/companies outside your current industry. IT candidates are needed in almost every industry in today’s professional world. Adam will need to be open to using his skills and experience in a field outside the automotive market.
  • Brush up on interview skills. Chances are when Adam does get called for an interview, it will be done via Skype or Zoom, or some other teleconferencing system. Even in a remote setting, he will still want to prepare for this interview as if it is a “in-person” meeting. Having a resume, list of his biggest career achievements, and answers to common interview questions by his side during the interview will help him to be able to speak confidently and with ease as he uses solid details to communicate why he is the best candidate for the job.

Whether our current economic crisis has you currently unemployed, furloughed, or preparing for a potential job loss in the near future, you can use the above tips to ensure that you, like Adam will be ready to take on whatever lies ahead in your career, and will find a job and success in your professional life.

Job Hunting: Best Practices for Today’s Job Market

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A fortunate few never actually look for jobs: they are recommended by colleagues or recruited by former co-workers. For the rest of us, here’s a toolbox of best practices to make job-hunting easier and more productive.

Personal Branding is Part of the Process

  1. DO have a recently-updated resume. Have it reviewed and reworked by an expert.
  2. DO have a recently-updated LinkedIn profile with a clear, professional-looking headshot.
  3. DO make sure the dates and titles on your LinkedIn profile match your resume.
  4. DO ask for recommendations from those who know you and your work well.

Online applications are changing.

Let’s say you are a pharmacist and you spotted a LinkedIn job posting that looked like a perfect next role, but there’s a catch – you need your LinkedIn profile updated. Forbes wrote that more and more companies are asking to include a link to LinkedIn profiles. It is wise that before you start applying for an online job posting, your own profile should be updated too.

 Where to Begin Your Search

  1. DO pick 5-10 companies you admire and for whom you think you’d like to work.
  2. DO your research online on each company, find a common connection, and ask for an introduction. LinkedIn is a great resource for this.
  3. DO invite people in these companies for a quick cup of coffee near their office. Say something like, “I’d love to hear what you like about working at X. Can I buy you a quick cup of coffee?”
  4. DO ask people you trust for a recommended recruiter who can help you.

 Networking for Your Job Search

  1. DO let friends and family know you’re looking for a new job.
  2. DO attend Meetups in your field of expertise.
  3. DO look for and join LinkedIn groups in your profession.
  4. DO expand your personal network by taking part in volunteer activities. Make sure to choose a cause that you truly care about.

How to Use Company Websites

  1. DON’T rely only on applying to jobs online unless your skills are in high demand.
  2. DON’T regurgitate your entire resume into your cover letter if you’re using one. Keep it simple.
  3. DO try to find an advocate inside the company as well as applying online.
  4. DO tailor your resume to the job, highlighting the most important skills.

New to the search. 

A jobseeker or maybe a new graduate may be searching for better employment. The perfect fit to get the right connection may be to check job boards online, especially for those who are looking in the finance field. Right now, this is a booming industry with an array of jobs for job seekers. Finance Jobs wrote that it helps if seekers explore their options to get the job that fits their skills.

 Stay the Course

  1. DO look for a job before you need one. 411 is easier than 911.
  2. DON’T get impatient. Depending on your salary, it can take 6-10 months to find the next right position.
  3. DO take consistent action so you feel empowered.
  4. DO take good care of yourself physically and emotionally.

Looking for the right job is tough, but it gets better. 

Once you’ve dealt with a couple of bumps while job hunting, you will eventually reach your goal of finding that next job. Though it doesn’t stop there. Beginning a job, whether you are new to the field or not, still takes adjustments. Pitfalls are intimidating in a new environment, says Psychology Jobs. Remember this: the velocity of your search should be the same as when you have a job.

 Adding Velocity to Your Search

  1. DO find ways to help others along the way.
  2. DO assume that things are working out for the best, keeping a positive outlook.
  3. DO stay curious and open-minded. That job that doesn’t seem to be a fit could end up being the best one in your career.
  4. DON’T allow yourself to become bitter, angry, or desperate. These attitudes are a repellent, and people pick up on them, even when they can’t pinpoint what it is about you that is off-putting.

Your job search can be a trial, or it can be an interesting and exhilarating adventure. By deciding to take the long view, asking for help along the way, and refining your job-hunting skills, you’ll be giving it the attention it deserves. Happily, your results will reflect this.

Post written by Katherine Davis for ProfessionalResumeServices.com

 

Top Tips and Techniques for A Successful Job Search

Guest PostsJob Search
c-level personal branding
c-level personal branding

Searching for a job is a crucial part of your professional career. It isn’t just about simply submitting a copy of your résumé to a recruiter and then waiting for a call. Because of the ever-growing influx of job seekers everywhere and the impact of the internet in our society, the process of job searching has changed a bit. Job searching nowadays is online and network-based. It’s a matter of using the resources you have at your disposal to get hired. And if you don’t have enough weapons on your arsenal, then you will have a tough time landing a job. If you’ve just hit another dead-end on your job search, then consider another plan of action. Here are some top tips and techniques for a successful job search to help you in crafting a job search strategy.

Take a Path to Self-discovery

First up, you must discover yourself. Do a detailed self-analysis to determine your skills, interests, achievements, ambitions, values, and potential. All of these are factors essential in finding the right job for you. Once you have found out what you really need and want, then it will be smooth-sailing from there. The next steps rely on what you find out in this process.

Adapt Your Résumé

Take as much time as you need to focus on writing a tailored résumé specifically targeting the job(s) you wish to apply for. Make sure that every important detail is mentioned clearly. Give the recruiter a chance to know why you are the best candidate for the job. Remember that most online job hiring posts can get pretty crowded, particularly a high paying job with good benefits, so the recruiter should be able to identify the skills you define at a glance on your résumé.

Find the Right Match

Find a shoe that fits. Since you have already discovered your needs and wants, it will be easy. Follow your interests, values, and skills to find the appropriate job to apply for. Do the necessary research and learn about the companies that you are interested in. See which ones have a suitable job offer that checks off the boxes on the list of your self-discoveries.

Be Proactive in your Approach

The normal thing to do after you’ve sent out your applications is to wait for a response from the recruiters. Do not do that. Although there is some truth to the saying “Good things come to those who wait,” you have to remember that we are living in a modern world. Instead of waiting, go out there and go after the things that you want.

Capitalize on Your Network

As cliché as it sounds, being able to “name drop” on your résumé or cover letter can elevate your application to the top of the pile or close to it. Make the best out of the network that you have to land a job. Reach out to former colleagues, team leaders, or supervisors to see if there is a job vacancy that they are aware of. If you just got out of school, you can ask your family members or friends if they can recommend you to a company.

Track Your Job Search Processemployment

The good thing about recruitment nowadays is that it’s done online. In the era of smartphones, it’s easier to keep track of your job search activity and applications. Keep tabs of all the applications you’ve sent. This way you’ll know which ones to follow-up one, what responses you’ve received, etc.

Set Your Goals

And last but not least, remember to set your goals, weekly or daily. This allows your mind to be an active participant in your job search. Make sure that you set attainable and measurable goals, which you can look back on in the future as a way to track your progress.

Author’s Bio: Rosette Monell works as a human resource personnel in an Asian firm. Aside from her job, she’s also a freelance writer who talks so passionately about public relations, different work ethics, and culture. On her free days, she likes to spend time alone with a good book about career building in one hand and a warm cup of tea in the other.

4 Ways to Help Employees Adapt to New Leadership Roles

Career & Workplace

 

 

Adapting to a new role can be difficult for any professional, but add the pressure of new leadership responsibilities, and things get even more complex. Helping employees adapt to their new leadership roles through career goal management, training, and feedback allows new leaders to transition with ease while moving the company closer to its goals. Below is a deeper dive into how to help employees adjust to new leadership roles within an organization.

Determine Employee & Company Career Goals

Leadership is carried out in all levels of a company, keeping the organization running smoothly and in-line with future goals. With this in mind, employers should survey all levels of a company to find top candidates who fit not only the responsibilities of the position, but who are future-focused and see themselves growing with the organization. Meet one-on-one to gain a stronger perspective on their career goals to determine whose skills best align with the demands of a given leadership opportunity. When sourcing internally and externally, use a human capital management system with extensive talent management capabilities to further search, organize, and streamline decision-making and assist in hiring the best candidates. Keep company core values in mind when selecting leaders to ensure they align with overall company missions to remain future-focused.

Implement Training, Mentorship, and Networking

Due to lack of proper training and mentoring, only 19% of organizations believe they’re effective at developing new leaders. Giving an employee proper guidance throughout their transition to a leadership role is vital. Devise a training strategy for all new leaders that includes routine training sessions to grow their skills as they gain more experience. Allow them time to apply their learning as they progress through the role, improving pain points along the way.

Training, mentoring and networking are sometimes misconceived as being costly, but there are plenty of low-cost initiatives involved in the process. A few examples include shadowing, attending training meetings, insightful readings, training videos, and volunteer networking events. Encourage networking to build new leaders’ relationships with not only fellow leaders and mentors, but with their team members as well. Leaders who connect with those they manage have a better understanding of how to utilize their team’s strengths and weaknesses to create a cohesive, successful team that yields positive results.

Allow Room for Creativity and Growth

When leaders are well-acquainted with their new positions, they should be left to exercise their own creativity within the standard responsibilities. Allowing leaders to weave their perspectives and ideas into the role creates the opportunity for improved strategies or processes. They may have previous knowledge that worked well in a past leadership role or bring ideas from being managed themselves. Leaders not only need to be the source of creativity, but should encourage creativity amongst their teams. Gaining insight from all levels allows a leadership structure to evolve with changing management demands. Leaders need to keep an open mind when collecting viable input from their employees. For instance, micromanaging hinders productivity and employee engagement.

Growth within an organization still applies to leaders. 65% of employees see opportunities for advancement as an essential component of their professional development. Allow leaders to grow their expertise by managing new departments with differing responsibilities or enact a team shift to broaden their network. Growth does not always need to be vertical, as lateral growth provides new opportunities to gain and improve skill-sets. This prevents burnout, monotony, and disengagement, all of which can be detrimental to operational success when they affect someone in a leadership role. Employers should present opportunities to all tiers of an organization and consider lateral growth as a major opportunity to support expertised personnel and ensure an engaged workforce.

Feedback and Routine Check-ins

Taking on a new leadership role can easily become overwhelming, especially for those with little experience. This is where performing routine check-ins becomes important. 43% of highly-engaged employees receive feedback at least once a week. Touch base with new leaders on a weekly basis to ensure they’re handling their new responsibilities. It can also be helpful to check in with the employees they are responsible for. Not all manager-employee relationships are going to mesh well, and this can result in poor productivity. Catching this pain point early is important and relies on open communication between the new leader and higher levels.

Receiving feedback from new leaders is also key to streamlining the training process. Their input can help shape training in a way that is more efficient and digestible, to ensure an easier transition for future leaders. Allow them to offer input on the current organizational structure as well, to determine new ways of operating to increase overall productivity and success.

Developing new leadership skills and expertise within an organization is no small feat, so having a strategy in place to ease new leaders into their roles is a great way to surpass this hurdle. Take the above tips into consideration when introducing new leaders into your organization to ensure they align with company missions and goals, and that they are up for the challenge!

What Networking Is and Isn’t

NetworkingSocial Marketing/Online Branding
c-level personal branding

When a job seeker realizes networking isn’t optional today, they will have a better chance of finding a job quickly. Even executives with extensive careers and who are considered to be experts in their industry have to always be working on their c-level personal branding. There are many misconceptions about networking, including the common belief that it’s not necessary to find a job. Here’s what you need to know about networking to clear up those misconceptions.

Networking Isn’t Asking For Favors

It’s natural for people to not like asking for favors, so they choose to skip networking events. However, your mindset going into a networking event should not be to ask for favors. Rather, it should be to generate engaging conversations with like-minded professionals and see where the relationship goes from there. Asking someone for a favor is not recommended since it could negatively impact your c-level personal branding.

Networking Isn’t Always Formal

If you’re intimidated by the thought of going to a formal event with hundreds of other people, then start out smaller. Make connections through your LinkedIn profile and if you make good conversations with someone, ask if they would like to grab coffee or lunch. Networking doesn’t have to be defined as attending a formal event. Making conversations with people informally is still considered networking and can even be more valuable since you have a one-on-one connection with the person.

Networking Is A Way To Tap Into Hidden Job Markets

The best executive resume writing service can educate you about the hidden job market if you aren’t aware of it. High-level executive jobs aren’t often posted on job boards or anywhere else. You have to know someone to even know there’s a job available. Networking is a perfect way to do it. Keeping up with connections on your LinkedIn profile is an effective method and could lead you to opportunities you didn’t even know were available.

Networking Is Beneficial For Reconnecting

Take some time occasionally to go through your list of connections on your LinkedIn profile and reconnect with them. You don’t have to be actively searching for a job to do so. Your connections will likely appreciate you reaching out to them just to get an update on how their career is going. It’s great for c-level personal branding to always keep your name at the forefront of people’s minds, and making simple conversations is a great way to do it.

Professional Resume Services always stresses the importance of networking to executives who visit us. We can give you tips on how to effectively display your LinkedIn profile, boost your c-level personal branding and much more. A quality resume is only one component of a successful job search, so feel free to reach out to us at any time to ensure you’re covering all bases with yours.