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When I joined Twitter in 2008 I had no clue who to follow or even what to do. After learning a bit more about it, I gathered my little list of resume experts that quickly expanded to experts throughout the careers industry. Through the years I’ve added more people to that list. With vast and various experience, these folks offer daily and weekly expert advice.  Whether you are new to Twitter or have been using it for a while, count these experts among your favorite go-to’s for career advice. I’m sure I am missing some (and will remember as soon as I hit “publish”) but for now, here are my fave peeps!

 

 

RESUME WRITERS

@amyladler Specializes in career transition and strength finding. Spot-on job search tweets.

@debrawheatman Resume writer and career coach offering tips and insight into job search and resume writing.

@avidcareerist With a background in retained search and current role as executive resume writer, Donna offers sage advice on resumes and job search.

@greatresume  Jessica Hernandez packs nuggets of heart into her career tips, tweet, and posts.

@hireimaging Barb Pool is a career strategist, coach, and resume writer with over 30 years of experience.

@karensilins Career coach, resume writer, presenter, personal branding specialist, and HR consultant fills her Twitter feed with valuable career information.

@laurieberenson Straight-forward resume writing and job search advice for professionals.

@lisarangel A triple threat! With experience as a former recruiter, current resume writer, and humorous wit, Lisa’s tweets offer insight into the recruiting and resume writing worlds.

@pushcareers Brenda Cunningham offers outplacement experience, job search strategies, resume writing, and career management tips.

@resumeservice Rosa Vargas offers authentic resume branding advice and career coaching.

@susanwhitcomb Resume writing pioneer, trainer, and job coach. She is the founder and President of The Academies and combines her vast experience with practical career tips.

@valueintowords Jacqui Poindexter turns your career history into a value-infused story. Follow her for resume and career tips.

 

CAREER COACHES

@CareerTL  CEO of Career Thought Leader Consortium, Marie Zimenoff heaps on loads of expert career advice from resume writing to social media advice.

@careerhero President of Career Directors International, Laura DeCarlo’s offers consistently informative career tweets.

@kccareercoach  As a career coach and marketing strategist for executives, Meg Montford shares resources, tips and advice.

@krisplantrich 9X certified Career Coach specializing in job search, interview, career transition, salary, and LinkedIn coaching.

@phyllismufson Career Coach and catalyst for personal and career transformation. Helps with job search, career change, and small business.

@susanguarneri Career assessment expert, certified branding strategist and management coach, and resume writer.

@coachwolfgang Career coaches and counselors specializing in multiple coaching disciplines that help individuals take ownership of their careers.

 

CAREER ADVICE & JOB SEARCH

@careerbliss Online company reviews, salaries, job listings, hiring trends and interview tips. Your one-stop shop.

@careersingov  Looking for a career in the government? Check out the nation’s largest State and Local Government Job Board and Career Center.

@classycareer List as Forbes Top 35 Most Influential Career Site and E-Learning Platform, launching dream careers, and businesses. Passionate about helping women succeed in their careers.

@flexjobs Looking for tips on finding a flexible hours, remote work, freelance, or just more work life balance? Look no further. Flexjobs posts jobs and informative articles every day.

@healthcareitcentral Weekly job alerts, an employer directory, and articles for clients in healthcareIT.

@jacobshare Job search expert, blogger, and community builder. His career tweets are interesting and plenty.

@jobhuntorg A careers pioneer whose website and posts offer guidance and tips on everything career-related.

@markadyson Career consultant, blogger, and expert podcaster, Mark keeps his tweets light and jam-packed with everything career.

@social_hire Helps candidates find their next great job. Daily tips and job search advice.

@themuse Offers career advice and matches candidates with companies and jobs looking for them.

@williamarruda Personal branding expert and motivational speaker offers daily job search advice.

@workcoachcafe Tips to help people become more successful in their jobs and job search. Forbes Top 100 Career Site.

@youtern  Enables young talent to become highly employable by connecting them to high-impact internships, mentors, and thru contemporary career advice that works!

 

RECRUITERS & HR

@absolutely_abby  Abby Kohut offers job search and recruiting advice to professionals. Selected as one of ‘Forbes Top 100 Career Websites’ and Fast Company’s ‘The Monster 11 for 2011: Career Experts Who Can Help Your Job Search’.

@chrisrussell Online recruiting, job board secrets, and HR consultant. Find out what recruiters are looking for.

@hrbartender Sharlyn Lauby delivers corporate HR tweets daily. Spot-on advice for interested job seekers.

@nickcorcodilos The author of Fearless Job Hunting and Ask The Headhunter, Nick’s tweets answer the burning job search and recruiting questions job seekers are asking.

@recruitmentgv Recruitment and Talent Acquisition news provided by the leading magazine for Recruitment Consultants.

@talentculture HR, Recruiting, Leadership and more. Be sure to save this social community as one of your favorite tweeters.

 

 

 

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the top reason professional resume distribution works

Is anybody in your family interested in your family history? My mom is our family historian. She has our family tree going back to the 1600’s! It’s pretty amazing what she’s found out and who she has met along the way. One thing most genealogists will tell you is that researching a family tree is a lot like networking. Many families will have one person in the generation who is willing to keep all the photos and letters and information, and finding that person is like finding a treasure trove. Instead of laboriously working on finding one branch, suddenly you discover that they’ve got the connections to a whole bunch of branches and they know the people who are the keepers of the photos and letters and information for all of them.

If you are interested in finding the connections in your ancestry, you need to find the people who are already doing the research. They have already made connections you have no access to until you contact them. For example, if you never meet Great Aunt Irma, then you won’t get to see all the letters your grandma sent to her dad with the pictures of your dad as a baby.

Networking

Companies use recruiters to fill executive positions and many other types of openings. A professional resume distribution service has carefully maintained connections with many professional recruiters so that a resume goes to the right recruiters for that job seeker. The connections have already been made: These are professionals who rely on networking for their career and carefully maintain the connections between them. Instead of Great Aunt Irma keeping your dad’s baby pictures, they’ve got first knowledge of job openings, and you won’t find out about it unless you connect to the right one.

This networking is the reason professional resume distribution works so much better than a blind email blast to every company in the phone book or a hopeful query out of nowhere. If your resume is presented by a reputable distribution service, that reputation enhances your resume by association. Recruiters get untold numbers of resumes all the time. It makes sense to filter them for efficiency. The fact you recognized quality and respected professional standards weights your submission with authority.

 

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the next step after writing your resume
You have carefully crafted your resume, reading all the tips and compiling your information before editing and polishing your presentation to be the best snapshot of the assets you bring to the hiring interview. How do you get that resume distributed so it gets read? It isn’t enough to go through the paper and send envelopes out to any address you find, hoping you get a response. A lot of companies will now ask you to apply online even though they advertise in that newspaper.

It’s a good idea to learn how to work with online applications and attach your resume electronically. This is pretty much standard, and not knowing how to do it limits you. It’s also a good job skill so you don’t have an excuse for ignoring that whole technology thing.

The next step after writing a resume – distribution – trips a lot of job-seekers up. They don’t really know how to distribute their resume and aren’t honestly aware of all the potential openings available to them. When you employ a hit-or-miss method to looking for a job, you are going to miss a lot of the job openings in your field. A “resume blast” indiscriminately blanketing the job market often is ignored or seen as spam.

If you are serious about distributing your resume effectively, consider working with a recruiter. This is a professional whose career is connecting companies and potential employees. They know exactly how to get your resume into the hands of someone who will want to call you in for an interview. Recruiters often specialize in certain industries or areas. You can do the research yourself, hoping you find the right match, or you can do this:

Professional Resume Services can connect you with the recruiters who fit your search. Instead of that resume blast or scattered attempts, the database of almost 16,000 recruiters is searched for the best options for you. This database is updated quarterly and has major recruiting firms, contingency and retained recruiters, and more. Once the recruiter is identified, a targeted letter in PDF and MSWord format is sent to each one. Then you get an Excel file with the contact information for every recruiter your resume was sent to.

That’s a lot more effective than circling want ads and hoping you find a job.

 

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internet handshake

It is very easy to think that, when you have sent out hundreds of resumes, those resumes disappear into thin air. However, if you post your resume online or email it in response to a job ad, your resume usually gets stored in a database. This database could be a job aggregator like Career Builder, or it could be an applicant tracking system for a company or staffing agency. Just because you do not get a response to your job application, it does not mean that nothing is done with your resume.

What is does mean is that you want to be careful who gets access to your resume and the information on it. Many people eagerly post their resumes on a job aggregator only to be contacted for jobs they do not want, such as franchise opportunities or life insurances sales or other jobs that require you to put thousands of dollars down to get started. One thing that smart job seekers do is to create an email separate from your personal ones for just this purpose, that way your personal email won’t be bombarded with annoying spam mail. If the company is interested in you, they will email you. However, be sure that you regularly check both your email inbox and spam for messages from potential employers.

Putting your resume on LinkedIn is also another way for your resume to ‘live on’. As LinkedIn can be used as an online version of your resume, it will still be working for you even when you aren’t in an active job search (as long as you keep up with your profile and don’t ignore it).

It’s important to remember that once your resume is ‘out there’ in cyberspace either on a job board or LI, it will stay there until you remove it. Be strategic about where you put your resume and you will have better results.

 

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Executive recruiters are a very useful resource for employers in the hiring process. They can have a profound effect on whether or not you get hired. This means you need to keep them happy in order to ensure you get the job. Here are some very important things to keep in mind that will help you keep recruiters happy.

  • Don’t be dismissive. Even if you’re happy in your current role, or just extremely busy, take a moment to speak to search consultants or to call them back. While you may not be interested in the position they’re seeking to fill, you may know someone who might be a good match. Search professionals appreciate getting references and practicing the law of reciprocity.
  • Don’t surprise them. More importantly, don’t surprise their clients. If you have a blemish on your record, let them hear your version first, before they learn it secondhand.
  • Don’t embellish. Even at the highest levels of executive search, some candidates can’t resist the urge to embellish their resumes. Sometimes they don’t get caught. In nine cases out of 10, however, they do. Avoid the pitfall and be honest.
  • Don’t fail your own history test. It’s surprising how many candidates can’t recite their own professional histories in chronological order. Know exactly what you did and where and when you did it before meeting with a search consultant. And it’s a good tuneup for meeting with a prospective new employer.
  • Don’t neglect your homework. Some candidates will spend the first 10 minutes of an interview asking basic questions about the position and the company at issue, showing that they never bothered to read the search specification. Candidates who do independent research create a favorable impression and show their clear interest in the new opportunity.
  • Don’t forget your manners. When meeting with an executive-search consultant, remember that every word, gesture or inflection will be duly noted.

Keep these in mind and you will be able to keep your recruiter happy and get the job.

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When it comes to job hunting there are two ways that you can approach it. Most people assume that standard job hunting is the best way to find their perfect job. This means that a majority of people feel that simply checking job websites and classified ads a few times a week is enough to bag them the job position they’re dreaming of. Sadly, this isn’t usually the case.

The job market is tough and competition for the jobs that are available is fierce. If you truly want to be successful in your job hunt then you need to up your game and do everything you can to make it happen.

When you’re seeking help with your job search, it is important to do so  from every angle – getting help with writing your resume, distributing it to the right places, and soliciting advice on where to look for jobs in your industry. It is essential that you look for opportunities in industry specific job boards, as opposed to just generic job websites, so you’re not  wasting time going through job vacancies that aren’t suited to your qualifications. Contacting professional placement agencies or recruiters may also give you insight as to what openings are out there for a candidate with your skills and experience.

There are plenty of ways to get help with your job search. You just need to be diligent in pursuing the job services and/or recruiting firms that are the best match for your career objectives.

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That looks phishy!

The Internet has definitely transformed how jobseekers contact hiring companies. Most company’s now have an option on their website to submit resumes, which makes it much easier and more convenient. You don’t have to spend hours printing and mailing or faxing resumes to countless recipients.

Because of this convenience a breeding ground for scam artists continues to grow each year as well. Identity thefts have increased to an overwhelming 10 million cases per year, and many of them are the result of phishing and the employment industry is under attack as well.

Phishing is an attempt to extract personal information through what appears to be authentic emails. You may get emails from a recruiter that looks legitimate but may not be. Knowing what to look for and how to spot fraud (or potential areas for abuse) can be the best way to ensuring you have a safe experience while conducting your job search.

Be careful of invitations to submit your resume. Scammers and spammers follow the same patterns. Mass emails are sent to a lot of people at once. Receiving an email from a recruiter who sends you an email to the effect: “We saw your resume on the Internet and we find your skill set to be perfect for one of our clients. Please complete our online application through the link below. Be very careful and think before you respond. Did you send your resume to this recruiter? Do not click on the link in the email, instead visit their website from a new browser window. Make sure everything looks right first. Always proceed with caution when you receive a cold-contact email from someone.

Do not give out personal information unless you know for sure the email is legitimate. Reputable companies will not ask for personal information via email.

Don’t just give your information freely. If a job application wants more information than you’re willing to provide, be very careful. With safe online practices, you’ll get the best return from your job-search efforts instead of filing a police report and/or calling credit bureaus and credit card companies.

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Right On Target

The electronic age has revolutionized the way job seekers and employers meet. Online services take the volume of resume traffic to levels unimagined only a few years ago. With services to job seekers expanding continually, it’s important to understand the different options available to increase exposure of your resume to potential employers and recruiters. Two types are resume posting and resume distribution.

Resume Posting. This is a service where job seekers post their resumes to a job board for employers and recruiters to find. This is a passive approach in that the employer or recruiter must find you within the resume database. They usually find you by calling up resumes via key words. The chances of their finding you depend greatly on your including all the appropriate key words in your resume.

This service is normally free to job seekers, and used only by those employers and recruiters who have paid a substantial fee to access the resumes. In other words, when you post your resume to an online resume posting service, not every employer or recruiter will find you.

Resume Distribution. This is actually opposite of a posting service. With a resume distribution, the job seeker has access to a select database of well-qualified employers and/or recruiters to email his/her resume to. This service does cost the job seeker a fee. The amount will vary depending on the service you use.

There are several advantages of a distribution service. The advantages include not having to wait to be found, you decide who receives your resume and you are in control of who actually gets your resume.

Make sure the distribution service allows you to target the employers who receive your resume. At a minimum, you should be able to query the employer/recruiter database by industry, job function and geographic region. If the service offers no targeting capabilities, your resume may be sent out indiscriminately to employers and recruiters who do not match your employment criteria.

For optimum resume distribution or posting effectiveness you’ll want to make sure your resume is updated. If you are not currently getting the response rate from your resume that you’d like, using a resume distribution service will only be marginally helpful, because you will still be distributing a resume that is not working for you.

Both services, resume posting and resume distribution, are valuable strategies for your job search. Don’t be turned off by the fact that one is free and the other you must pay for. The money spent on a good quality resume distribution will repay you over and over again with valuable job leads and introductions to influential recruiters. After all, aren’t you worth it?

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Occasionally I get asked about recruiters, if the client should use one, how companies find them, and what recruiters do for companies. So here is a little article on what recruiters are about.

Making the best use of recruiters is something that almost all major corporations do now. Taking advantage of someone that is trained to sort through people means less hassle for the company—and why not? Less hassle means fewer headaches for those businesses.

Recruiters are people who have been trained specifically to hunt for various corporations to fill empty positions. They place ads in newspapers, online and in magazines to get the attention of any individual that might qualify for a job opening that they might have.

Taking the time to find recruiters who know what they are doing is the first important step for a company. Without excellent recruiters, corporations likely will not end up with the type of people that they want working for them.

Finding the best use of recruiters is up to the corporations that employ them, however, companies need to pick and choose where the need is for new hires in particular. In other words, will the corporation be expanding in Asia and the Western United States? If so, recruiters look for individuals who might have the ability to speak Japanese or Chinese, or are bi-lingual/fluent in other languages.

Another possibility would be if a company has decided to open a whole different operation. For example, Company A typically has been a restaurant chain. Now Company A wants to start some retail stores, and has the means to do it. Using a business plan, Company A will make the best use of recruiters by sending them out in whatever area it defines to find candidates to interview. Company A will have certain guidelines for the recruiters to go by, but the recruiters will pick the potential candidates.

Once the potential candidates are picked, recruiters will typically thin out the crowd somewhat before sending the candidates in for an interview. Recruiters take the time to sit and talk to each candidate for several minutes and are usually tuned in well enough to people that they can spot instantly who would work for the job, and who wouldn’t.

When you have recruiters who are available, it makes life much easier for the corporation. It is one less step that the Human Resources Department has to be concerned with. When there are so many other things that HR people have to do, using recruiters makes their job easier. For large corporations, making use of recruiters on a regular basis is a great benefit and saves them plenty of money. Smaller corporations on the other hand, may not see a benefit except once in a while—perhaps when searching for a new Chief Executive Officer or other high-ranking position.

So here is your little lesson on how recruiters help companies and what that means for you!

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Men in Hats 1950's

Gone are the days of searching for a job the old fashioned way… knocking on doors.

Today’s job seekers are leveraging the power of the internet to network with colleagues through online profiles, make connections with decision makers, and apply for jobs through a company’s website online.

Social media is changing the landscape of how people relate to each other. Before the advent of keeping track of people online, it was harder to maintain an extended network. Now, it’s possible to catalog all the people you’ve known through previous jobs – and to keep in touch with them as well. This has had numerous impacts on the workplace, and how people get jobs.

In the early days of the internet, people would search job boards. Monster.com and Yahoo!Jobs were touted as the hot new thing, and these job boards were huge for the recruitment industry. Here was a (relatively) cheap way to reach thousands of people across the whole world with news about your job opening. While still extensively used, job boards seem to have fallen to the baseline. They require little to no personal interaction to apply for a job. On the recruiter’s side, they often have to deal with spam bots which send out limitless replies to job advertisements. Not as bad as spam bots, but still very annoying, are people who apply on every job on the board, regardless of how qualified they actually are for the job. The entry-level recruiter who spends their day sifting through hundreds of applicants for an administrative assistant’s job is practically tearing his/her hair out.

Now, a lot of recruiters are on Facebook, and there are some people who exclusively advertise job openings they’re working to their Facebook friends. This is helpful, because friends can direct their friends to connect with recruiters – and people that are recommended for a job are much more likely to get it than a random faceless applicant.

Twitter is another way that job news is getting out. Subscribing to a Twitter feed is an easy way to get information on a job – even if it’s only 140 characters. A job title and a few keywords are often enough information for a job seeker to determine if they’re interested in an opening.

LinkedIn, which is a site dedicated to professionals looking to maintain their personal business network, is also another place that has exploded with opportunities. At first, LinkedIn was just a way to keep track of people – now, you can post pictures, presentations, your blog posts, Twitter feeds, daily ‘status’ and so much more. LinkedIn is ripe with job opportunities.

At first, people created groups for job-seekers. Then, recruiters made groups through which they would post openings. Groups such as, “Jobs for Software Developers” attracted only the niche market they were going after – people who were looking for software development jobs, and friends of people who might be interested. LinkedIn capitalized on this phenomenon by creating a job board integrated with their website. Now, people can pay for a job ad, and have their links recommend their friends for a job. I am going to stop right here with LinkedIn. You all know how I could talk about its benefits 24 hours a day.

What has made social media a great outlet for finding a job is the fact that the internet has changed from a broad scope to a niche marketing tool. Take advantage of it.

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