Out With the Old and In with the New…LinkedIn Job Search Tips for 2022

Job SearchLinkedInSocial Marketing/Online Branding

If you’re planning on starting a new job search in 2022, you need to know that how you search for a job has changed greatly over the years. Whether you’re a new grad, management professional, seasoned executive, or C-Suite office holder, you need to ensure that you have the “dos” and “don’ts” of today’s job search necessities down to a science BEFORE you start your search. One necessary tool for today’s jobseekers is having an optimized LinkedIn profile! A few easy “dos” and “don’ts” to consider when preparing your LinkedIn profile for a job search….

URL:

  • DO customize your URL and put a link to your profile on your resume. If your name is already taken, use a middle initial, special numbers, or a credential to make your URL unique.
  • DON’T use the URL that LI assigns you when you create your initial profile.

PROFILE BANNER:

  • DO have a customized banner at the top of your profile. There are plenty of free sites to create a banner on, or, if you aren’t into doing your own thing, hire a designer to create one for you. This is where you can show a little personality on your profile while still looking like a professional.
  • DON’T use the LI default banner or your current company logo – if you are in a job search.

PROFILE PHOTO:

  • DO post a recent, professional-looking headshot of you (and ONLY you) in the photo.
  • DON’T post of photo of you cropped out of a group photo at an event or a photo of you from 20+ years ago – you don’t want to see shocked faces when you arrive for your interview!

NAME:

  • DO display your name as it appears on your resume and what you go by in the workplace. Add any relevant credentials after your name.
  • DON’T use a nickname or outdated maiden name just because that’s the name you had when you created your original profile.

HEADLINE:

  • DO create a branding statement for the top of your resume and in the headline section of your LI profile. Use descriptive, high-impact, and industry-specific keywords to communicate your brand. You have 220 characters to brand yourself here – make them count!
  • DON’T use your current job title (LI default) in your headline – ugh…so boring!

ABOUT:

  • DO include a targeted, keyword-saturated career summary at the beginning of your resume and in your LinkedIn profile (About) section. Remember to write toward the job/industry you’re targeting. You have 2,600 characters to write your story – use them to your advantage!
  • DON’T bypass this section – and don’t just make it paragraphs of boring text – readers will lose interest in you and your qualifications immediately. Use bullets to separate sections that give a brief synopsis of your skills, experience, and achievements. Show the value YOU can offer in one quick read!

EXPERIENCE:

  • DO put your most up to date and relevant information on your resume and LinkedIn profile. Include achievements in bullet lists and job titles that are in line with what is on your resume.
  • DON’T include your entire career history-only jobs that are relevant to your current career goals. Stay away from posting proprietary or confidential information in this section.

EDUCATION:

  • DO include all of your relevant degrees. Undergraduate, graduate, post-doctoral, etc.
  • DON’T include the years if you graduated 10+ years ago, or information about what you did in college unless it is pertinent and relevant.

LICENSES/CERTIFICATIONS:

  • DO list certifications/licenses that are relevant to your career goals. If you are currently in the process of getting a certification/license, then just add it with the expected date of receiving the credential.
  • DON’T list actual license numbers (hello identity fraud???) on LI or include outdated information that is no longer active (unless it matters if you had it in the past).

SKILLS:

  • DO use industry-specific keywords/skills on this list. Be descriptive and ensure that your skills are in line with your level, job skills, experience, etc. “Pin” your top 3 skills at the beginning of this section. LI does this automatically – you need to ensure that the top 3 are truly, well, the top 3!
  • DON’T list bland words like “Leader” or “Projects”. Focus on stronger terms – “Executive Leadership” or “Project Management”.

PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS:

  • DO include your memberships in professional organizations (especially in industry-specific organizations). List your role in each organization (Member, Board Member, Committee Chair, etc.).
  • DON’T list organizations that you haven’t been affiliated with for years.

VOLUNTEER WORK:

  • DO include recent volunteer work or past work that may be relevant to your current job search goals. Include any leadership positions with organizations or special events you chaired.
  • DON’T put in volunteer work from 20+ years ago or if it was an event that was a one-hour commitment!

ADDITIONAL SECTIONS:

  • DO look at all the additional sections LI offers (Patents, Projects, Honors/Awards, Courses, Publications, Languages, etc.).
  • DON’T add a section just to add a section. You want to have relevant and informative content on your profile – not uninformative fluff that takes up space.

RECOMMENDATIONS:

  • DO give/request recommendations from clients, colleagues, supervisors, etc. Encourage those giving you recommendations to make them achievement/leadership-focused, so that the best you have is what they are talking about. You should have recommendations that are as current as possible.
  • DON’T use recommendations that are filled with typos or information that is outdated/unmeaningful.

SETTINGS:

  • DO check your settings and ensure that they are aligned with how you want to be seen, who you want to be able to see you, etc.
  • DON’T turn your profile completely off to public viewing. What’s the point of being on LI if nobody can see you?

DO make the profile unique to YOU. Make sure you can back up all the information you have put out there during an interview, and ultimately on the job for your next employer. DON’T take information from a friend’s or colleague’s profile or include skills/achievements that you can’t own. Your LinkedIn profile is a living document – keep it current and fresh. Finally – you have optimized the information on your profile, now you need to network! Engage with others by posting and commenting to get your name/profile seen by more people!

Tips to Negotiate a Raise

Guest PostsSalary

Asking your boss for a raise can be one of the most anxiety-inducing things you ever do at your job. Because of how nerve-wracking it is, many people wait too long to get the raise they deserve. Too many people fail to understand that there’s no reason to be anxious about asking for a raise, especially if you’ve been working hard and helping the company grow. However, there are some ways to ask for a raise that are better than others and have a higher likelihood of getting you what you deserve.

Even if your manager praises you daily, you’ll still need to give them a reason why you deserve more money, and you should be prepared to negotiate your rate. Here’s tips on how to ask your boss for a raise.

Collect Feedback

Your resume has changed since you applied for your current position. As you’ve worked for  the company  many years, you’ve picked up new skills and found new ways to help the business expand. Whether you have quarterly or annual performance reviews, the odds are you’ve received positive feedback since your last review. Keep all the praise you receive  organized, so you can use it to build your case for why you deserve a raise.

You should also give yourself an evaluation. Make a list of all you’ve accomplished for the business. If anything goes above and beyond your job duties, make a note of what it is and how often you do it. You should also add any long hours you’ve worked to the list and include everything from your managers’ reviews to coworkers’ feedback.

Have Data Prepared

People respond best to facts and data. If you want a raise, you’ll need to bring numbers to the table. Now that you have a list of all of your accomplishments, try to add details by adding numbers when possible. You can even use invoices to track your pay stubs.

For example, if your department benefitted from your work, try to include how they benefited, such as an increased rate of productivity or time and cost savings. Be as specific as possible. If you increased sales by a certain percentage or led a team who did, add that to your list. Bringing  details to the conversation gives proof as to why you deserve a bump in pay.

Consider the Future

Employees ask for raises because they have a track record of working hard and succeeding. However, managers and bosses need to know you’re looking for an opportunity to grow within the company, and not just for the money. When you ask for a raise, consider talking about next steps, more responsibility, or what is necessary to rise to the next level. You can also come prepared with a detailed explanation of where you see yourself within the company and where you want to go in the future.

Check the Handbook

Knowing when to ask for a raise can help you be successful in getting gone. For example, an upcoming performance review allow you to advocate for yourself to HR or the business owner so you can get a raise exactly during a time when the company is considering your future with them.

Your employee handbook will give you an idea about how raises and promotions are handled within your company. While these career milestones can happen at any time, they typically happen during performance reviews, which allow you to prepare for the right moment to ask for a raise.

Give Them a Number

Asking for a raise and not knowing how much you want or need to stay with the company can be detrimental to your cause. If you want a raise, you should have a number in mind—determining the amount and sharing it with  your boss is the reason why many people have anxiety in these situations. However, if you have done your research and know your value, as well as your contributions to the company, you feel confident in what you think is fair, and, you’ll have a higher chance of success.

Don’t forget, your boss may  try to negotiate. So be prepared to compromise. Consider other non-monetary perks, such as vacation, education benefits, etc. air rate would be by 10%.

Book a Time

This is not a discussion that you want to have in the hallway. Book a time with them when you know they’ll have nothing else on their mind. Consider the company schedule, as well as their responsibilities.

Practice

Asking for a raise can be intimidating, but the worst thing that can happen is being turned down. Most people will not get fired because they want more money. HR professionals expect that almost all employees will eventually ask for a raise or a promotion to improve their work/life balance.

By practicing with your friends and family, you can make the ordeal less stressful. You’ll be able to go into the meeting anticipating what your boss will ask or how they’ll reply to certain parts of the conversation.

 

Matt Casadona has a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, with a concentration in Marketing and a minor in Psychology. Matt is passionate about marketing and business strategy and enjoys San Diego life, traveling, and music.

 

 

5 Resume Hacks for 2020 Job Seekers

Guest PostsJob Search

Finding that first job after graduating or starting a career change can be one of life’s greatest challenges. Getting a solid job in the industry you want to work in, however, can open doors to success that lasts a lifetime. That makes landing a strategic job worth all the effort you put into it.

That effort starts with your resume. Putting together your resume, whether it’s your first time or just the first time in years, can feel daunting. However, it doesn’t have to be. With a few clever tips, tricks, and savvy hacks, your resume will communicate your talent and experience clearly to all potential employers.

Get ready to wow at your next job interview with these 7 simple hacks that you can use on your resume today.

The structure should depend on the stage of your career

First, it’s important to think about the overall structure of your resume. Where should each section go — what sections should you have in the first place? First, it’s a good idea to make a distinction between an early career resume and a mid- or late-career resume.

What’s the difference? In an early career resume, you probably don’t have too much work experience to brag about. If you do, good for you, you busybody! Either way, it’s likely that the most impressive achievement you have accomplished so far is your schooling. Whether that’s an associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s degree, or technical schooling certification, if you’re looking for your first job, it’s smart to put your degrees or certificates first on your resume.

  • Takeaway: if you’re early in your career, your resume should lead with an Education section.

Those whose school days are long behind them, and who have been working in the career world for some time (maybe 7 years or more) should think about leading with their job experience. It’s likely that you have spent a good amount of time seriously developing your leadership, communication, management, and teamworking skills while on the job by that point in your career. Sure, your schooling is pretty impressive, but employers will want to know what you’ve done since you graduated.

  • Takeaway: if you’re in your mid-to-late career, think about putting your Work Experience first, then your education later.

Once you’ve settled on the order of the general sections, it’s time to think more specifically about how you’ll lay out your work and schooling experiences.

Make sure your resume tells a story — chronologically

Employers reviewing applications often don’t have a ton of time on their hands to sort out confusingly laid-out resumes, so one way you can make it easy for them (and give yourself a more comprehensive look) is by laying out your resume chronologically.

In each section, Education and Work Experience, be sure to lead with your most recent position. Employers are probably more interested in your work managing a team of programmers for five years than the internship you had as an undergrad.

Once you’ve correctly laid out each section chronologically, it’s time to think about the story that your resume tells. Remember, that reviewer is on the clock, and you want to communicate to them as concisely and effectively as possible what value your experience and education will bring to their company.

  • Pro tip: 

If you’re applying to jobs in a few different industries, consider having different resumes for each one. You may have a variety of experience that’s relevant more to one industry than another, and your resume is your chance to highlight that.

Depending on the type of job you’re applying to, it’s okay to spin each position you worked for to best match that role. The truth is that, in most jobs, you’re likely performing a variety of responsibilities, so it’s totally okay to highlight the aspects of your past work that tells the most coherent and engaging story about your schooling and work experience so far. That brings us to our next tip.

Always highlight achievements from past experiences

Your resume is your highlight reel. You want potential employers to see clearly and quickly how you will add value to their company or organization. When crafting each entry describing past work experience, it’s likely not worth it to list out everything that you did at each job. Sure, it’s great that you can answer emails or do the basics of what your past jobs required of you, but that’s not the stuff that will set you apart from everyone else in the pile of resumes.

So, rather than simply describing the duties of your past jobs under each entry, list 2 to 4 noteworthy accomplishments you made while working there. Perhaps you solved a really tricky programming puzzle that no one else on your team could. Or maybe you wrote an article that brought more views to your site than any other for months. Maybe you were able to settle a difficult disagreement among coworkers and got your team back on track. Whatever it is, highlight it on your resume; it makes it clear how much value you can contribute to your new workplace.

Devote a section specifically to your skills

Next, it’s a smart idea to create a section for your skills. The way you decide to incorporate it design wise (more on that below) is up to you, but commonly, people have a box that lists their skills toward the bottom of the resume, or along the side.

Skills are concrete abilities you have that you will be able to start using the day you step into your new role. Maybe it’s web design, or using engineering software, or writing search engine optimized marketing copy. Whatever it is, employers want to know if you have the skills for the job. Your skills section is the place to make that completely clear.

Get creative with design, but keep it professional

Resumes have advanced beyond the classic Word document in Times New Roman font. Sure, for some employers (think law firms or accounting agencies), that’s still the gold standard. However, for many employers, having a creative resume with beautifully designed elements is a great way to stand out.

Luckily, there are plenty of free or inexpensive templates available online. So, even if you’re not a professional graphic designer, you can still have a gorgeously designed resume, laid out perfectly to draw potential employers’ attention directly to the parts of your experience you most want to highlight.

Resume design and layout isn’t an exact science, but by having the right structure and content, you increase your chances of landing that dream job you’ve always wanted.

At the end of the day, writing a resume can still be a daunting task. Trying to write objectively about yourself can be difficult. If you need help in crafting that resume to sell yourself to a potential employer, you may want to consider hiring a professional resume writer who has years of experience developing resumes to highlight all your achievements and skills.

Samantha Rupp holds a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration and is the managing editor for 365businesstips.com. She lives in San Diego, California and enjoys spending time on the beach, reading up on current industry trends, and traveling.

Two Ways To Enhance Any Career

Career & Workplace

two ways to enhance any career
Did you know that anybody can enhance their life, and thus their career, by improving some simple, basic skills? Once you have a handle on these skills, there’s no telling what can happen but you have to apply them consistently: everybody needs to learn how to learn and learn how to teach.

Learn How To Learn

Learning is essentially acknowledging that you don’t know everything and being open to expanding your horizons.

  • What are you reading? If you don’t read, start slow and it will get better quickly.
  • If you are always reading a novel, try reading some non-fiction regularly.
  • If you never do fiction, start with some short stories and work up.
  • Take a class in something that appeals and intimidates you.
  • Play games on  your phone or computer that are not in your comfort zone, like words for a math whiz and numbers for the linguist.
  • Learn how to use your hands or your body a different way, like dancing or knitting or soccer or anything fun.

I bet you thought I’d be telling you to work on a career skill, and that certainly is a good idea. But for many of us, we need to start developing the ability to learn first. When you start with what you like and stretch your mind a little bit, you are learning how to learn.

Learn How To Teach

Teaching is not being a windbag standing in front of suffering students and talking to hear themselves. Good teachers listen to their students and try to understand how they perceive things so the facts being communicated get through to the brain. A teacher needs to have a good grasp of the subject in order to explain it effectively.

  • Offer to explain something you are good at to a friend who wants to know how.
  • Show a newbie some tips about a skill you have.
  • Write instructions just to see if they make sense when you follow them.
  • Improve your writing skills so you can communicate better.
  • Rewrite things that are confusing to make the meaning clearer.
  • Research the styles of learning and figure out how to explain to each style.

The truth is that we all teach, whether we realize it or not. The goal is to be a teacher of good, helpful things who passes on all you have learned. When a person continually is learning, and is also continually sharing their knowledge, it completes the circle of intelligent growth. It also keeps you in a positive stance for whatever your career is doing and enhances any job.

What Skills Do Successful Job Seekers Have?

Job Search

what skills do successful job seekers have?
If you would do a search online for “successful job seeking skills” a long list of opinions would come up. Some of the same skills will be on everybody’s list, but at the same time there’d be some differences. It gets overwhelming, doesn’t it? I think that if you look at the combined lists of skills as a description of your inadequacies and stop there, you’re in trouble. 
Probably the worst thing to do when you have been searching for a job unsuccessfully is looking at yourself as a failure and giving up. Probably the best thing to do when you have been searching for a job unsuccessfully is look at yourself as ready to take steps to improve and taking one step.
Do you see what’s different here? It’s not in having all the skills the market is looking for; it’s how you look at yourself honestly, acknowledge your inadequacies, and take action to improve yourself. Those are the skills that successful job seekers have because they have kept working at the various things on their plate and not given up.
Here’s a good first step: start reading the posts on this blog under job search. Here’s a good next step: do something you realize you need to do after reading one of them. And all the steps after that are variations of the same idea: research for solutions and pick one to do. What do you want to/need to change? I know this isn’t easy but with each step you accomplish, you get some confidence. You will develop a skill set that works in any part of life, including the job search and ultimate employment.

Essential Skills to Include on Your Resume

Resumes

You're Hired!There are many skills you can put on your resume, but there are two specific skills that are very important to employers and will help upgrade your resume:

  1. Customer Service
  2. Strong Work Ethic

These skills are important in almost any field of work, and here is why:

  • Customer Service: Companies have customers. That is how they make money. They get paid by a customer, a client, another company, etc. to perform their purpose as a company, making customer satisfaction a very important facet of their business. If their customers are not happy, then the company will lose business and money. How do they keep those customers happy? By providing the customer with the product or service and providing it through employees that exhibit excellent customer service. If you have learned how to be an excellent executor of customer service, and you express this on your resume, you will be at the top of the list for jobs, because employers will know that you will help keep their customers happy and help them make money.
  • Strong Work Ethic: Micro-managing is one of the most inefficient forms of management. It keeps supervisors from getting more things done and it keeps employees from feeling that they enjoy their work. If you have to be micro-managed in order to get your work done, you are wasting time and losing revenue for the company.  However, if you are able to work well on your own without supervision and can produce good work independently, then you are working more efficiently and in turn, helping the company save and earn money.

If you have both of these skills, and show where you have used these skills throughout your career,  you need to make sure that you feature them prominently in your resume. If you don’t have these skills, then learn them. Work on them and learn how to utilize customer service and a strong work ethic in any situation so that you can upgrade your resume and land a great job.

What Do You Do When You Disagree With Your Resume Writer?

Executive ResumesJob SearchResumes


Hiring a resume service can be a very helpful tool for many job seekers who are stuck and don’t know what to do or where to go with their resume. Sometimes, however, you may disagree with your resume writer or service. You may not feel that their vision coincides with your vision and tension may occur. Dealing with that tension and disagreement can be difficult, but here are some things to remember that should help you get through the process and end up with a great resume.

  • Have A Clear Idea In Your Own Head: If you don’t know what information you want to put in your resume, then how can you expect your resume service to know? You need to think about what you want to do, where you want to be,  and what skills and experience you have had to get you to your next career.
  • Communication is Key: Talk to your resume writer. Make sure that you have given them adequate information and have clearly expressed your career goals and vision. Even the best writers cannot build a resume unique to your needs if you haven’t communicated where you want to be in your career. Give the writer as much information as you possibly can, then let them do their job and streamline the information to create a resume will appeal to employers.
  • Keep It Professional: It will only make the situation worse if you are angry and bitter. Keep yourself calm and it will not only make the communication easier, but it will also be more enjoyable.
  • Above All, Remember You Are Their Boss: You have hired them. You are paying them to help you, not the other way around. Don’t let them walk over you. If what they are doing is not what you want, then you have the right to talk to them and get it fixed. However, also know that you hired them because they are certified, skilled writing professionals. You are paying them to stay on top of industry trends and share their knowledge of what content and layout works best to communicate your expertise and career history. You just need to make sure that your resume truly represents who you are and where you want to be in your career.

Keep your relationship with your writer open and professional, and you will end up with a great resume that truly markets your value to employers.

What Needs To Be Included In Your Career History?

Executive ResumesInterviewingJob SearchProfessional ResumesResume Writing

work experience
One of the most important sections of your resume is your employment history. This is also one of the most interesting areas for potential employers. It will give them an idea of a few things: how long you have been working, if the work you have been doing is similar to what they do, and what you may have achieved in each position. A well-written employment history will give potential employers an idea of how you would fit in working for their company.
Employers are looking for quick, impressive information in a resume.  Each entry in your work experience should look something like this:
Job Title/Dates of Employment (years)
Company Name, City State
Brief Narrative

  • Achievement
  • Achievement
  • Achievement

This is merely an example. There are many other formats out there to document your employment history, and they should all have the same basic information: dates of employment, the name of the company you worked for, where the company is located, job title, and your duties and achievements. You should include your most impressive on-the-job functions, as well as the ones that are the most like what you would be doing at the new company.
Including the right information in your employment history may be the key to landing an interview, and then, hopefully an offer.