Gregory Peck in

By now I’m sure you’ve seen the constant updates in your LinkedIn news/status feeds from your connections. Where are they coming from and why are they here all of a sudden?

LinkedIn has opened up its publishing platform –also called Long Form—so that you not only get regular content from the people you follow (i.e. Richard Branson, Martha Stewart), but also from your connections. They began with inviting 25,000 members and then slowly opened it up to everyone. If you are wondering how this might work for you and your job search, or how to get started, here are a few tips.

1.      Why should you publish on LinkedIn? It’s a way for you to build your executive brand, share insightful content, increase your visibility, and expand on your knowledge, thus making you more credible to your network as an industry thought leader. If you don’t already have a blog or another platform, this is a good place to gather interest.

2.      Make sure your LinkedIn profile is complete and current. If you haven’t added your most recent job, do so now. Clean up your profile. Do you have a recent photo? Do you have the professional affiliations, training, projects, etc. on it? Once you publish your first article, people will be looking at your profile, so make sure you look and sound your best.

3.      Beef up your contacts. If you haven’t been diligent about making new connections, or connecting with people who reach out to you, get started now. The more connections you have, the wider your reach. Keep in mind that when people “like” or “share” your content, your post will go out to other networks faster.

 4.      Determine what you want to talk about. What do you excel at? What is your expertise in? What message do you want to give? What do you think your readers would like to read about or know more of? Want to get a conversation started? Writing an engaging blog post is a great way to do that. Does this post solidify your personal brand? If you already have ideas or posts lined up, then you’re ready to go. If you go to the status bar on your home page, you will see a little pencil on the right (by the paperclip), this is what you will click to open up your publishing page.

5.      Your expertise won’t just show on LinkedIn but in other forms of social media. Remember that when you publish on LinkedIn, the more keywords, comments, “likes” and “shares” you have, the more traffic you will drive to your post through outside search engines and social media as well. Keep it professional and clear. Drive home your brand.

 

When a perspective employer is looking at your profile and determining if you are the right fit, displaying your professional expertise by having some thought-provoking posts might be what exactly what they are looking for.





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Written by Erin Kennedy, MCD, CMRW, CPRW - Visit the website to hire executive resume writer Erin Kennedy, CERW, CPRW

Erin is an internationally renowned certified resume writer specializing in professional and executive level resumes and career services.

habits that advance your career

When someone has been been promoted often enough, they know what it takes to advance a career. Marillyn Hewson, who is Chairman, President and CEO of Lockheed Martin shares from her experience in 5 Habits That Can Lead to a Promotion.

There are advantages to staying with a company and working your way up the ladder, but these habits will be good ones to develop no matter where you are working in the next decade or so. Here is what she looks for and encourages:

  1. Look for ways to solve problems on the job. Anticipating, identifying, and creatively addressing issues shows leadership potential. You can share your suggestions and let your boss decide what to do with them; even if your ideas go unused, your efforts will be noticed.
  2. Accept assignments that stretch you. Meeting those challenges gives you more opportunities.
  3. Keep track of your results. When there’s a hard number to point to, it should be on your resume. Recording the evidence of your efforts validates your work experience when applying for another position.
  4. Understand your company’s leadership values and look for ways to develop those qualities.
  5. Success is a team sport – every leader is part of a group that works together for a greater good. Work on making your workplace a better place to work and your efforts will be appreciated.

Marillyn Hewson speaks from her position as someone who has worked through many levels and positions at Lockheed Martin. She knows what your higher-ups are looking for. She says,

“Senior leaders spend a lot of their time focused on developing talent, building succession plans, and identifying who is ready to take on a leadership role. The success of an organization rides on doing this effectively. By practicing these five habits, you could be at top-of-mind when the next leadership position opens up.”





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Written by - Visit the website to hire executive resume writer Erin Kennedy, CERW, CPRW

Erin is an internationally renowned certified resume writer specializing in professional and executive level resumes and career services.

don't forget to shine your shoes

Did you know that the mistake made most often in getting ready for an interview is unkempt shoes? According to the Shoe Service Institute of America, 89% of business recruiters rate good grooming high on the requirement list for senior executive material, and the way you take care of your shoes is a big part of the image you present. Here’s another quote from this source:

“Shoes are a reflection of their owner’s personality. That’s what both personnel professionals — who have been known to observe people closely — and white collar workers (the people they usually observe) said. Well kept shoes stand for professionalism, attention to detail, ambition, efficiency, conscientiousness, organization, confidence and even friendliness.”

Now most of us really don’t go around looking at everybody else’s shoes all the time, it’s true. But there is one time that your appearance is critically evaluated from the top of your head to the soles of your shoes, and that’s during an interview. The way you have groomed your clothing and shoes shows how much you care about detail and the work it takes to keep things in good repair.

If you don’t bother to shine your shoes or repair that ripped seam for an important interview, what else will you ignore once you are on the job? If you aren’t interested in ironing a wrinkly shirt, will you be the best candidate for a position that represents the company? These issues might seem a bit nit-picky but what sloppiness reveals is character, and all the interviewer can go on to determine what you will be like is the references in your resume and the evidence in your appearance.

It doesn’t take much research to figure out how to dress for that job interview, and it doesn’t take much work to get that outfit in good condition. But don’t forget to shine your shoes.

 

 





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Written by - Visit the website to hire executive resume writer Erin Kennedy, CERW, CPRW

Erin is an internationally renowned certified resume writer specializing in professional and executive level resumes and career services.

decode summertime casual fridays

Do you ever feel like “Casual Friday” in the summer months is like looking at an artistic photo that’s supposed to mean something? The problem is, everyone interprets that meaning in a slightly different way. Business Casual is tricky anyway (the link is to all the blogs on this site that address the subject), but summer heat and vacation mode seem to make “casual” more important than “business” for a lot of us. The problem is that the wrong kind of casual keeps you from being taken seriously.

Break The Code In Your Workplace

It doesn’t really matter what anybody else says about how to dress in the workplace. Really. What matters to you is the written and unwritten dress code that is being used right now where you actually work. So start with the written code — ask for a copy of the official “how to dress for this workplace” dress code that Human Resources should have on paper.

Now take that paper home and pull out everything in your wardrobe that works within the guidelines. Some people even keep their work wardrobe separate from their non-work wardrobe so that mornings are easier on business days. Figure out a basic “work uniform” that will be the foundation of what you wear all the time. Many suggest switching out only one thing on casual days to lighten up the look but stay professional.

Having the written code down lets you evaluate the unwritten code you see around you at work.  Notice who is showing a lot of skin, and who is wearing flip flops — what positions do these people hold? Unless you work at a scuba diving shop on the beach, it’s probably not your boss. Every company has a culture, and the clothes we wear reflect the culture. But every company also has a hierarchy and the clothes we wear send signals about where we see ourselves in that hierarchy.

If you want to break the code for your workplace, pay attention to what your supervisors and the higher-ups are wearing. You’ll start to see that those who are taken seriously at their job take their wardrobe — even summertime casual Fridays — seriously, too.

 





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Written by - Visit the website to hire executive resume writer Erin Kennedy, CERW, CPRW

Erin is an internationally renowned certified resume writer specializing in professional and executive level resumes and career services.

a visual view of resume keywords

Have you ever made a word cloud? The most popular version of a word (or tag) cloud generator is Wordle, but there are many other options out there. Teachers love creating word clouds for visual learners because it helps the student see the most frequently used vocabulary in a text.  But you can use your favorite word cloud generator to compare the frequency of words in a job opening and your resume.

Here’s why I think this is a good idea: you’ll quickly see if any words in your resume match the words in the ad.

What you are seeing in that word cloud is the key vocabulary in the text — keywords. Resume keywords play an important role in getting your resume into the “call for interview” pile on an important desk. You’ll also get an idea of how often you use certain words to describe yourself. Does your resume word cloud show an active, effective candidate? Does anything match the word cloud of the position you are applying for? If it doesn’t, then you have some work to do on your resume.

The closer your language matches the language in the ad, the more apt you are to be seen as a “match” for the position. It should go without saying that I’m not telling you to make stuff up, because lying on a resume is a bad idea. But highlighting the similarities between your qualifications and the qualifications of the candidate they are seeking is a good idea.

If you are a visual learner, using a word cloud generator to evaluate your resume and the job opening is an easy way to see which words are being used most often and decide what to do with the way your resume is written.





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Written by - Visit the website to hire executive resume writer Erin Kennedy, CERW, CPRW

Erin is an internationally renowned certified resume writer specializing in professional and executive level resumes and career services.