how to decide which job is for you

Glassdoor recently came out with their list of the 25 Best Jobs in America for 2015. Their criteria for the Glassdoor Job Score is based on three factors — earning potential (average annual base salary), career opportunities rating, and number of job openings. It’s a pretty nice list, from the sales engineer at #25 to the #1 physician’s assistant. It covers a lot of career fields and your own “best job” just may be on the list.

Then again, it might not.

Filter Job Options Wisely

Picking a career based solely on how much money you will make is not a good idea because there are a lot of other factors involved. The career opportunities and probability of employment (number of job openings) are two more factors, and for a list that covers everybody in America, Glassdoor does a good job. But narrowing down the options to the best strategies for your particular career path means you need to filter out what won’t work for you.

One place to start would be in taking a good look at your current resume to see what you are qualified to do. If you don’t want to do what you are qualified for, you have a great place to start deciding what needs to change. Look at why you don’t want to do what you are qualified for, what you may be interested in, and research how to explore that potential.

Other filters to use are location, current debt load, and family obligations. Every factor you can think of should come into your planning. Your dream job might be a nightmare if you don’t consider all the factors in your own life first.

Get Sound Advice

Choosing a career mentor who is willing to help you figure out your options is one of the best things you can do with your career plans. This is a long-term networking strategy that should be mutually beneficial. Getting a lot of advice from many sources will give a big perspective, but getting advice from someone who knows you is going to help you avoid some stumbling blocks in the path of your career.

 

 





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Written by - Visit the website to hire executive resume writer Erin Kennedy, CERW, CPRW

Erin is an internationally renowned certified resume writer specializing in professional and executive level resumes and career services.

10 qualities every exec should have

To be effective in upper-level management, you need a specific set of traits. It’s also important to exhibit these attributes through your actions, as well as the company’s executive bio and your executive profile for social media. While there are other factors affecting your abilities as a manager, displaying these traits will increase your chances of success.

1. Leadership Skills

A personal drive to lead others is a necessity for those who want to serve on the executive level. While leadership skills can be acquired traits, an innate tendency to lead will serve you better in a position of power within a company.

2. Sales Drive

Some salespeople are adept at making a pitch, while others pride themselves in their ability to close. If you want to be a successful executive, it’s best to be skilled at both making a pitch and closing the sale. As a leader within the company, you will need to sell yourself, your ideas and the business on a regular basis.

3. A Realistic Viewpoint

Having a dream and goals is important for a successful career, but a realistic viewpoint is even more critical. You need to be able to recognize what is possible and execute the required processes to achieve those goals.

4. Patience

Patience is a virtue every executive should have. You can’t expect all of your efforts to produce results immediately. Patiently waiting for the proper timing and the right resources will help you bring your business to the forefront.

5. A Broad Perspective

Keeping short-term goals in mind is essential for ensuring daily objectives are met for your company, but having a broader perspective can be invaluable. Seeing the bigger picture will help you make smaller decisions along the way.

6. Courage

When most people think of courage, they consider the risks that need to be taken to move forward. However, courage can also be defined as the strength required to stop or change direction.

7. Financial Expertise

Many businesses have a finance division to handle the day-to-day financial elements. However, many companies want an executive team that can keep the budget in mind and understand how money flow factors into the function of the business.

8. Domain Expertise

Technology has become a major component in the world of business. You should command a basic knowledge of the latest technology as it relates to your industry. Don’t forget to showcase your technical knowledge in your executive bio.

9. Honor

The dictionary defines honor as adhering to what is right. In the business world, displaying honor lends an authenticity to your management style. An honorable philosophy and actions allow you to readily connect with your team and your customers on an emotional level.

10. Perseverance

The business world is rapidly changing, which can make it difficult to keep up and stay on top. This is why the drive to keep going, even when things aren’t proceeding as planned, is important.

If you need help highlighting these personality traits in your executive profile,contact us. Our professional resume writing services are designed to showcase your best attributes, making you more attractive to prospective employers.





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Written by Erin Kennedy, MCD, CMRW, CPRW - Visit the website to hire executive resume writer Erin Kennedy, CERW, CPRW

Erin is an internationally renowned certified resume writer specializing in professional and executive level resumes and career services.

expert advice: be less responsible at work

Why would an expert suggest that being less responsible at work is a good idea? But that is exactly what Dorie Clark, a marketing strategist and professional speaker who teaches at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business says in the Ideas section of Time. Why You Should Be Less Responsible at Work goes against some opinions about making yourself irreplaceable and takes a look at a larger perspective of your career path.

Get The Right Things Done

The main focus of Ms. Clark’s advice is that in order to lead, you have to learn to prioritize what your responsibilities entail. That means figuring out the 20% of your to-do list that yields the 80% of your results. It also means learning to procrastinate strategically by doing something appealing instead of the job you are stuck on — but making your procrastination activity something else on your list of things that need to get done. It also means learning to delegate.

Delegation is not just passing off your work to somebody else. Delegation is a skill that successful CEOs do all the time as they build a team of people who take pride in their contributions. At the other end of the career path, there isn’t much to delegate yet, but you can learn that sometimes saying NO to others is saying YES to yourself.

It’s far too easy to fill our agenda with tasks that look busy but don’t actually give much reward. It’s also too easy to take over all the little responsibilities that others neglect and neglect your own because you are busy doing too much. Learning how to prioritize effectively, to procrastinate strategically, and to delegate appropriately is good advice for all of us.

 





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Written by - Visit the website to hire executive resume writer Erin Kennedy, CERW, CPRW

Erin is an internationally renowned certified resume writer specializing in professional and executive level resumes and career services.

what is keeping you from success?

Reputation management is like keeping a window clean so it doesn’t hinder the view. I don’t know about you, but the windows at my house don’t get cleaned until I realize they are obstructing my ability to see outside. Ideally, those windows should be kept clean on a schedule so it never gets that bad. Holding off on doing anything about accumulating dirt isn’t really a good idea with windows or with reputation management.

Scheduled Maintenance Keeps Little Issues Small

It’s a good idea to keep an eye on your online reputation by regularly doing some searches on all variations of your name. Remember to log out of any Google accounts so your search results aren’t skewed. Set up alerts for your name so you see when something comes up. You may not be doing anything at all, but a real threat is that a hacker could do some damage before you realize it is happening.

If you are looking at your online persona regularly, you can catch an issue and deal with it before it becomes a big problem.

Proactive Measures Prevent Problems 

Ideally, you have two email addresses: One for business and one for personal use.

Social media can make it hard to keep business and personal identities separate, but privacy settings and separate accounts help. The problem is that it is easy to figure out who people are if you have any search skills at all, and employers are very good at researching candidates.

When you are regularly adding positive content to your online presence, there’s a growing momentum of good stuff to find. Reputation management and your career might feel like all you do is wash the windows, but clean windows let people see who you are. The more clearly you are able to show your professional and positive contributions, the better your reputation online.

In short, reputation management is about keeping the view clear so the world can see what you actually have to offer.





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Written by - Visit the website to hire executive resume writer Erin Kennedy, CERW, CPRW

Erin is an internationally renowned certified resume writer specializing in professional and executive level resumes and career services.

how to move on in your career without burning bridges
One of the more important things you learn as you move up the career ladder is that it has all kinds of crazy switchbacks putting you back in contact with the people you used to work with. This is particularly true when you stay in the same industry, but it happens for all of us no matter where we move in our job path. Think of all the “old friends” you have on Facebook and you’ll see what I mean. Who knew you’d be in contact again?

Burning Bridges Usually Is A Bad Idea

It’s very tempting to tell an annoying co-worker or aggravating boss exactly what you think of them when you hand in your resignation. After all, you are quitting so you don’t have to live with the consequences, right?

Wrong.

These are the people who give you references, and who will be talking about you in the months ahead. Nowadays that gossip goes online in moments and is there for a potential employer to find. We all have to work on reputation management, when you think about it. So what should you do instead when you have been looking for another job and finally can move out of your old one?

Leave Your Connections Intact

You can’t make everybody like you, but you can be responsible and professional up to the end of the job. Many ask how much notice should be given when leaving a job. The standard two weeks notice is probably the best idea. One young professional had been looking for a new position with her manager’s encouragement since attempts to move up in the company continually fizzled. When offered a position in a new field, she was asked if she could start right away. This is how she told the story:

I knew that my manager would be okay with the idea of me leaving right away, but it would be leaving them in the lurch as they tried to fill my position. I told my new boss that I really thought I should give them at least two weeks notice and asked if he was okay with that. He said that he would get back to me.

When he spoke to me again, he said that the more he thought about it, the more he liked that I respected my previous employer’s need for the full two weeks and that he would hope his employees offer him the same respect. So I start in two weeks.

This young woman has the right idea. Her last two weeks at her old job will be good ones, and she hasn’t burned any bridges if someday she wants to come back.





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Written by - Visit the website to hire executive resume writer Erin Kennedy, CERW, CPRW

Erin is an internationally renowned certified resume writer specializing in professional and executive level resumes and career services.

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